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Academic Programs and Advising

SPRING 2016

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 Courses and Descriptions

 

HISTORY 

 

1.   History 114:  History of the Jewish People I –  Professor Franklin 

Class #:  62098 – Tu Th  - 10:45am-12:00pm  – PH 108 – 3 hr. -  3 cr. 

The ancient period.  Emphasis on the interpretation of literary and archaeological evidence in light of modern scholarship. (Perspectives: meets PI) 

 

2.   History 115:  History of the Jewish People II – Professor Bregoli 

      Class #:  62101– Mo We – 10:45am-12:00pm – RZ 109 – 3 hr. - 3 cr. 

      The Jewish Middle Ages from the decline of the Palestinian center to the beginnings of civic emancipation (ca. 200 A.D. to 1789). 

 

3.  History 255: VT: Transformational Moments in the Arab/Israeli Conflict – Professor McGee 

     Class #:  62153 – Tu – 3:10-5:50pm - PH 157 – 3 hr. - 3 cr. 

     Students will take on the roles of Israeli, Palestinian, Arab and American negotiators 

     in this semester long simulation.  The current moment is full of crisis and challenge 

     for you, “negotiators”, as you convene for a series of secret meetings that you hope will lead 

     to a final peace accord between your two people; the Israelis and the Palestinians.  Will you  

     be able to jump start the process?  Might you succeed where others have failed?  This course 

     is part of the award winning “America and the Middle East: Clash of Civilizations or  

     Meeting of Minds” series of courses. 

 

4.   History 256: History of Modern Israel – Professor Alteras 

      Class#: 62154 – Mo We - 10:45am-12:00pm – PH 108 - 3hr. - 3 cr. 

      The history of Israel from the founding of the state to the present, emphasis on the 

      circumstances leading to the establishment of the Jewish state and on the domestic 

      and foreign policy of Israel. 

 

 

5.  History 257: History and Culture of the Bukharian Jews – Professor Rybakov 

     Class #: 62156 – Tu – 3:10-5:50pm – KY 315 – 3 hr. – 3 cr. 

   This course offers an overview of the history and culture of the Bukharian Jews, one of the 

     oldest Jewish communities formed in Central Asia as an independent ethnos with a  

     special way of life, its own language, and well defined national ethnic self-identification. 

     This course will look at the origins of the Jewish population in Central Asia and will 

     concentrate on the second part of the 19th century (period of Russian conquest of the 

     region in 1865) till the present time (massive exodus from the former Soviet Union),  

     when the new communities were developed in Israel and the USA.  By the end of the 

     semester, students are expected to have acquired a literacy, if not fluency, in the  

     development of the Bukharian Jewish ethnos in Central Asia, its achievements and downfall,  

     community, culture, traditions, music, language and literature.   

 

6.  History 295: Sephardic Jewish History – Professor Bregoli 

     Class #:  62170 – Mo We – 1:40-2:55pm – KY 417 – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

    This course introduces students to Sephardi history and culture in the early modern 

    and modern period.  We will begin with an overview of Jewish life in the Iberian 

    Peninsula and the events leading to mass conversions and expulsions in Spain 

    and Portugal in the 15th century.  We will explore the creation of new communities 

    and identities in Europe, the Ottoman Empire, and the New World in the aftermath 

    of the 1942 expulsion, with special emphasis on the Sephardi communities in North 

    Africa and the Ottoman Empire, modern political forms, the Holocaust and 

    migrations.  We will conclude with a brief section on contemporary Sephardi. 


HEBREW 

 

HEBREW - BASIC LANGUAGE COURSES 

 

 7.  Hebrew 102 :  Elementary Hebrew II –   Professor Wender 

      Class #:  67083 – Mo We  – 10:05-11:55am  – QH 265H  – 4 hr., 4 cr. 

      Prereq: Hebrew 101 or equivalent.  A continuation of Hebrew 101. 

 

 8.   Hebrew 204:  Intermediate Hebrew II – Professor Wender 

       Class #: 67090– Mo We – 1:40-2:55pm – QH 265H  - 3 hr. – 3 cr.  

       Prereq.:  Hebrew 203 or equivalent.  A continuation of Hebrew 203. 

       (Satisfies language requirement.) 

 

HEBREW - COURSES IN ENGLISH 

 

 9 . Hebrew 150:  Modern Hebrew Lit. in Translation – Professor Chetrit 

      Class #: 67100 – Mo We – 10:45am-12:00pm – QH 270F – 3 hr. - 3 cr. 

      Readings in modern Hebrew literature in translation. 

      (RL, WC) 

 

10. Hebrew 150: Modern Hebrew Lit. in Translation – Staff 

      Class #: 67110– Tu Th – 10:45am-12:00pm – QH 270F – 3 hr. -  3 cr. 

      See above description. 

 

11. Hebrew 150: Modern Hebrew Lit.in Translation – Professor Gruber 

      Class #: 67114– Mo We – 9:15-10:30am – QH 270F – 3 hr. -  3 cr. 

      See above description. 

 

12. Hebrew 150: Modern Hebrew Lit.in Translation – Professor Gruber 

      Class #: 67117– Mo We – 1:40-2:55pm – QH 345H – 3 hr. -  3 cr. 

      See above description. 

  

HEBREW – ADVANCED LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE COURSES 

 

13. Hebrew 358: The Modern Hebrew Media – Professor Chetrit  

      Class #: 67123 – Mo We – 5:00-6:15pm – QH 270F- 3 cr. – 3 cr. 

      Readings of Israeli newspapers and journals, listening to Israeli radio, watching television in 

      Hebrew, and browsing the Hebrew web. Students will learn the language of Hebrew  

      journalism and the history and politics of Israeli media today: right/left, east/west,  

      religious/secular, and more. Students will learn to write, record, and/or videotape an oped  

      piece and publish it online. 

      

ENGLISH 

 

14. English 153W: Intro to the Bible –  Professor Shippee 

      Class #: 57526– Mo – 6 :30-9:20 pm – KY 246 – 3 hr. -  3 cr. 

      Selected books of the Old and New Testament in English translation.  Cannot 

      be taken for credit if student has taken English 381.  (CV, WC, PI) 

       

ANTHROPOLOGY 

 

15.  Anthropology 212: Peoples of the Middle East – Professor Limbert 

       Class #: 64586 – Mo We – 9:15-10:30am – PH 304 – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

       This course examines anthropological approaches to the Middle East and North Africa. 

       We will investigate who inhabits this vast geographical area, as well as the region’s diverse 

       traditions, beliefs, histories and practice.  We will discuss the cultural changes that 

       have emerged in the wake of social, political and economic transformations from the 

       Colonial period to the present.  Previous knowledge of Middle Eastern history, geography 

       or anthropology is not required. 

       Prerequisite: 6 credits in social science or sophomore standing. 

     

PHILOSOPHY 

 

16. Philosophy 116: Intro to Philosophy of Religion – Professor Malagon 

      Class #:  62337  - Mo  – 6:30-9:20pm– PH 152 – 3 hr. -  3 cr. 

      A philosophical examination of basic concepts in religion such as God,  

      religious meaning, faith, and religious experience.  Readings will be selected from 

      classical and contemporary sources.  (CV, ET) 

 

17. Philosophy 116: Intro to Philosophy of Religion – Professor Leites 

      Class #:  63797 – Mo We – 1:40-2:55pm– PH 304 – 3 hr - 3 cr. 

      See above description. 

 

18. Philosophy 116:  Intro to Philosophy of Religion – Professor O’Connor 

      Class #:  63801 – Tu Th – 10:45am-12:00pm– KY 281 – 3 hr - 3 cr. 

      See above description. 

 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

 

19.  Religious Studies 103: Introduction to Judaism – Staff 

       Class #: 66830 – Tu Th – 1:40-2:55pm – QH 270F – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

       History of the development of Judaic beliefs, practices, and interpretive traditions.         

       Representative selections from Mishnah, Talmud, Kabbalah, and later thinkers. 

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

 

20. Political Science 240:  Contemporary Middle East – Professor Flamhaft 

      Class #:  57453– Tu Th – 10:45am-12:00pm – PH  121 - 3 hr -  3 cr. 

      A survey of Middle Eastern governments, political processes, and political group behavior.       

 

21.  Political Science 260: The Middle East in World Politics – Professor Petaludis 

       Class #: 58626– Th  – 6:30-9:20pm – PH 204 – 3 hr. - 3 cr. 

       The expansion of the European State system into the Middle East and the regional 

       adjustments.  The changing patterns of regional and international politics in the 

       Middle East, contrasting the League of Nations and the United Nations systems.  

       (WC) 

THE FOLLOWING IS A LISTING OF COURSES ON BROAD THEMES AND TOPICS, WHICH EITHER CONTAIN A JEWISH COMPONENT IN THE FORMAL SYLLABUS OR WHICH ALLOW YOU TO DO PAPERS AND ASSIGNMENTS ON JEWISH-RELATED ISSUES WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE COURSE.  THE COURSES WILL COUNT FOR THE JEWISH STUDIES MAJOR AND MINOR IF STUDENTS DO JEWISH STUDIES-RELATED WORK IN THE COURSE.    

 

HISTORY 

 

22. History 104:  American History 1865-Present – Professor Davis-Kram 

      Class #:  62063 –Tu –  4:30-7:20pm – RZ 109 – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

      The United States from Reconstruction to the present time. (SS, US) 

      Jewish Studies students could do research on an area of Jewish studies such as 

      immigration, Jews in the early, or later, motion picture industry, Jewish political issues  

      and leadership , Jewish women in the women’s rights struggle, United States involvement 

      (or refusal) to rescue Jews during the Holocaust, Jewish victims of the McCarthy era, etc. 

 

23.  History 263: Progressive Era: Tech., Immigration and Urbanization – Professor Davis-Kram 

       Class #: 62167 – Tu – 12:15-2:55pm – RZ 109 – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

       Contact History Department for course description. 

 

24.  History 370: Film & Hist. – Women in Hollywood – Prof. Davis-Kram 

       Class #:  62182 - Th – 12:15-2:55pm – RZ 109 – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

       Selected topics to show the representation of history through film and the impact of film  

       on history. Subjects may vary. May be repeated once if the subject is different. 

 

Jewish Studies Majors/Minors should speak with Prof. Davis-Kram very early in the semester regarding Jewish Studies credit for History 263 and History 370 in order to get individual research topics.  


POLITICAL SCIENCE 

 

25.  Political Science 102: Current Political Controversies: Religion & Politics – Professor  

       O’Hara 

       Class #:  57335 – Mo We – 9:15-10:30am – PH 121 – 3 hr., 3 cr.  

       This course introduces students to the basic analytical and evaluative tools of political science through an examination of particular controversies. Each section will focus on a current controversy such as life and death (abortion, the death penalty, etc.), minority rights (affirmative action, homosexual marriage, etc.), and religion and politics, and then explore the wider and more general issues it entails. (SS) 

 

SOCIOLOGY 

 

26. Sociology 211:  Ethnic and Racial Relations –  Professor Lewis 

      Class #: 62598– TBA – TBA –3 hr. -  3 cr. 

      Major ethnic and racial groups, ethnic contact, and ethic relations in 

      American society and in other cultures.  Prereq.: Sociology 101 (SS, US) 

      Requirement Designation: Flexible Core: US Experience in its Diversity 

 

27. Sociology 211:  Ethnic and Racial Relations –  Professor Sperry 

      Class #: 62606– Mo We – 3:10-4:25pm – PH 117 - 3 hr. -  3 cr. 

      Major ethnic and racial groups, ethnic contact, and ethic relations in 

      American society and in other cultures.  Prereq.: Sociology 101 (SS, US) 

      Requirement Designation: Flexible Core: US Experience in its Diversity 

       

28. Sociology 221:  Sociology of Religion – Professor Cho 

      Class #: 62694– Tu  Th – 12:15-1:30pm – PH 117 – 3 hr. - 3 cr.  

     The nature of religion, its relationship to other institutions, and its changing role 

     and function in modern society. 

 

29. Sociology 241: The American Jewish Community – Professor Ament 

      Class #:  67073 – Mo We – 10:45-12:00pm – KY 427 – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

      This course will be examining a distinctive ethnic and religious group and the ways that it   

       has attempted to adapt to the American environment while retaining its group identity.  Both 

      achievements and challenges will be highlighted.  We will also be analyzing and critiquing  

      two recent widely publicized surveys: the 2012 New York Jewish Community Study and the  

      2013 Pew Research Center Study on U.S. Jews. 

      No prior knowledge about Jews or Judaism is required. 

   For questions, feel free to contact Professor Ament directly at jonathon.ament@gmail.com

 

30. Sociology 289:  Sociology of Death & Dying – Professor Heilman 

      Class #:  62806 – Tu Th  – 10:45am-12:00 pm – PH 351– 3 hr., 3 cr. 

      This course focuses on attitudes toward death, funeral practices in various cultures, 

      The cultural components of mourning, and the social organization of death and dying in 

      Bureaucratic settings such as the hospital and nursing home.  The course will include  

      Practices and customs associated with the Jewish death and dying. 

 

      Sociology prerequisites may be waived after a consultation with Prof. Heilman. 

 

SPANISH 

 

 31. Spanish 51: Hispanic – Jewish Literature in Translation – Professor Glickman 

       Class #: 66924 – Tu Th – 9:15-10:30am – QH 260 – 3 hr., 3 cr. 

       Introduction to Hispanic-Jewish fiction and critical material (Latin American, Brazilian and Spanish, Sephardic and Ashkenazic). Students will learn to read, discuss and write about texts in fulfillment of the norms of literature as a discipline, including techniques of close reading, stylistic analysis of formal features and literary genres and periods.  Students will learn to read  novels, short stories, plays and diaries and analyze literary and cultural models that seek to define identity. 

 

Available course descriptions are provided.  Please contact the individual department or professor for additional course information. 

UNLESS REQUIRED AS PART OF THE CORE COURSES, THE 100 LEVEL COURSES ARE LISTED AS ELECTIVES ONLY AND DO NOT COUNT TOWARD THE JEWISH STUDIES MAJOR/MINOR.  (Exception: Hebrew 150 counts toward the JS Major/Minor). 

 
OFFICE INFORMATION
Director: Professor Arnold Franklin
Office: Jefferson Hall, Room 306-310
Phone: 718-997-4530   
            718-997-5730
Office Hours: Mon - Fri 9am-5pm
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