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Undergraduate Course Descriptions

The following course descriptions are those in the college bulletin and may vary by semester.  The English Department maintains a bulletin with more detailed descriptions of courses for the current and upcoming semester.

ENGL 095, 095.0. Introduction to College Writing. 4 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Entrance determined by results of placement examination. Emphasis will be on a variety of writing forms, including narration, description, and analysis; attention will be given to matters of grammar, syntax, punctuation, and diction. The student will spend one hour per week meeting in conferences, small groups, or other formats for intensive writing instruction and practice. This course is designated for eligible ESL students.

ENGL 110. College Writing. 4 hr.; 3 cr. The arts and practices of effective writing and reading in college, especially the use of language to discover ideas. Methods of research and documentation will be taught, along with some introduction to rhetorical purposes and strategies. Students will spend one hour per week conferring with each other or with the instructor about their writing.

ENGL 115. VT: Topics in Writing. ENGL 115.2, 2 hr.; 2 cr., ENGL 115.3, 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq. or coreq.: ENGL 110 or permission of the department. A writing course for students who wish to extend the work of ENGL 110. This course is designed to focus students’ attention on specific topics and issues in writing through extensive reading, practice in a variety of writing techniques appropriate to the topic, and reflection upon the readings and their own written work. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include cross- cultural analyses of life stories; comparative analyses of different disciplinary forms of argument; sentence and paragraph styles; the art of writing reviews. When the topic scope and amount of reading warrant it, this course will be offered on a 3-hour, 3-credit basis. The 2-hour, 2-credit version may be taken twice when the specific topic varies.

ENGL 120W. Writing, Literature, Culture. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. A writing course that involves continued practice in writing, together with close reading of various kinds of texts. Courses are structured around one or more thematic, sociocultural, or historical issues such as identities, community, gender, quest narratives, or the arts. Students will explore the issues as they read and write about specific texts.

ENGL 134W. Writing Tutorial. 1 hr.; 1 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110; coreq.: A designated English course. Instruction and practice in writing relevant to the main course. Fulfills one writing-intensive unit. May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 135W. Writing Workshop. 1 hr.; 1 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110; coreq.: A designated English course. Instruction and practice in writing integral to main course. Fulfills one writing-intensive unit. May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 151, 151W. Works of English Literature: A Course for nonmajors. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. An introduction to the development of English literature from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century through a study of selected poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfictional prose. Authors include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Keats, Dickens, and Joyce. Designed for nonmajors. (H1T1)

ENGL 152, 152W. Works of American Literature: A Course for nonmajors. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. An introduction to the development of American literature from its beginnings to the twentieth century through a study of selected poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfictional prose. Authors studied may include Thoreau, Hawthorne, Whitman, Dickinson, O’Neill, Hemingway, and Wright. Designed for nonmajors. (H1T1)

ENGL 153, 153W. introduction to the Bible. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. Selected books of the Old and New Testaments in English translation. Cannot be taken for credit if student has taken ENGL 381. Designed for nonmajors. (H1T1)

ENGL 154, 154W. Great Works of Fiction. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. An introduction to fiction through a reading of great novels and short stories from various periods. Designed for nonmajors. (H1T1)

ENGL 155, 155W. Great Works of Drama. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. A careful reading of important plays from different periods, designed to give the student a grasp of the history of dramatic literature, the variety of dramatic forms, and the possibilities of theatrical craft. Designed for nonmajors. (H1T1)

ENGL 156, 156W. introduction to Shakespeare. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. A basic course in Shakespeare’s plays and poems. Designed for nonmajors. (H1T1)

ENGL 161, 161W. Introduction to Narrative. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. Why do human beings produce and consume narratives as prolifically as they do? How are stories constructed? How do readers approach and consume them? What is the role of narrative in culture? This course primarily studies prose fiction, but it may include drama, narrative poetry, nonfiction, and film, as well as criticism and theory of narrative. It may be offered as a general introduction to narrative, or it may focus on a particular topic, such as Life Writing, Popular Literature, Myths and Folktales, or the Contemporary Novel. (RL)

ENGL 162, 162W. Literature and Place. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. Use of literature to deepen the understanding of the rich, complex, and varied engagement between human beings and the places they inhabit and imagine. Examination of how places, with their history, traditions, myths, customs, tensions, social structures, and physical form interact with people’s lives. Specific sections will focus on a particular city, neighborhood, or region, or on a topic such as City and Country, Women and the Black Diaspora, Utopia, the Literature of the Sea, Elizabethan London, the American West, Colonies, Imaginary Places, Homelessness, or Outer Space. Readings may include fiction, drama, poetry, life writing, and nonfiction. (RL)

ENGL 165W. Introduction to Poetry. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. Close reading and critical analysis of a wide variety of English and American poetry of various periods. This course combines the study of literature with continued training in clear and effective written expression. Designed for prospective English majors. (H1T1)

ENGL 170W. Introduction to Literary Study. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. An inquiry into what it means to study literature, involving close reading and critical analysis of a wide variety of prose fiction, drama, and poetry, and informed by an introduction to some of the theoretical issues currently invigorating literary studies. This course combines a study of literature with continued training in clear and effective expression. Designed for prospective English majors and other interested students. (H3)

ENGL 200W. Essay Writing. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. The writing and criticism of formal and informal essays, various types of articles, reviews, and reportage, with an emphasis on the fundamentals of style and structure and the development of effective expression.

ENGL 201W. Essay Writing for Special Fields. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110, or permission of the instructor. An intermediate expository writing course using forms and modes appropriate to various professions and disciplines. Special fields covered in the past have included medicine, law, business, computer science, teaching, psychology, music, art, and film. Some sections of this course will be limited to students enrolled in the Business and Liberal Arts minor.

ENGL 210W. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: B in ENGL 110 or 120W. Introduction to the writing of poems, stories, and plays, with related readings. This course is a prerequisite for the workshops in fiction (301W), playwriting (302), and poetry (304).

ENGL 211W. Introduction to Writing Nonfiction. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: B in ENGL 110 or 120W. Introduction to the writing of non fiction as an art form, in such modes as the personal essay, the review, new journalism, the memoir, and the postmodernist pastiche, with related readings. This course is a prerequisite for the workshop in non fiction (303W).

ENGL 251. British Literature Survey I. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W), or permission of the department. A historical study of the diversity of British literature from the beginnings through the seventeenth century, encompassing a range of writing by women and men from various cultural, ethnic, and popular traditions. (H1T2) 

ENGL 252. British Literature Survey II. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W), or study of the diversity of British literature from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century, encompassing a range of writing by women and men from various cultural, ethnic, and popular traditions. (H1T2)

ENGL 253. American Literature Survey I. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W), or permission of the department. A historical study of the diversity of American literature from the beginnings to the Civil War, encompassing a range of writing by women and men from various cultural, ethnic, and popular traditions. (H1T2)

ENGL 254. American Literature Survey II. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W), or permission of the department. A historical study of the diversity of American literature from the Civil War to the twentieth century, encompassing a range of writing by women and men from various cultural, ethnic, and popular traditions. (H1T2)

ENGL 255. Global Literatures in English. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W), or permission of the department. A historical study of the diversity of modern and contemporary Anglophone and related literatures translated into English encompassing the complex transnational and postcolonial nature of much modern writing in English. (H1T2)

ENGL 265. An Introduction to Folklore. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. An introduction to the study of the oral literature and lore—fairy tales, legends, ballads, etc.—that have, from the earliest times to the present, circulated within rural communities and within urban groups unified by ethnicity, age, or occupation. Study and practice of techniques for collecting, classifying, and interpreting this material. (H3)

ENGL 280. Literature and Film. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110 or high pass on placement examination. A study of the literary aspects of film art, focusing on its narrative and poetic structure.

ENGL 285. Studies in Literature and Film. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110 or high pass on placement examination. The topic of the course, announced in advance, varies each semester. The course may be taken for credit more than once if the topic is different. Note: English majors may offer only one film course (ENGL 280 or 285), not both, as part of the major.

ENGL 290. The English Language. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The study of modern English, its present structure, its early origins, and its development. Attention is given to vocabulary and semantics, the English language in America, and principles of linguistic change. (H3)

ENGL 295. Modern English Grammar. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110 or high pass on placement examination. The study of grammatical analysis and of problems of sentence construction, usage, and diction. The course compares traditional and new techniques.

ENGL 299.1, 299.2, 299.3. Internship. ENGL 299.1, 45 hr.; 1 cr., ENGL 299.2, 90 hr.; 2 cr., ENGL 299.3, 135 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the department. Experiential learning through placement. Opportunity to test and demonstrate academic learning in an organizational setting and receive academic credit. Internships may also carry a stipend. A learning contract as well as an academically related project will be worked out with an advisor. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 3 credits may be applied to the major in English.

ENGL 301W. Fiction Workshop. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: B in ENGL 210W or permission of the instructor. Intensive practice in the writing of fiction, with related readings. May be repeated once for credit toward degree but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 302. Playwriting Workshop. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: B in ENGL 210W or permission of the instructor. Intensive practice in the writing of plays, with related readings. May be repeated once for credit toward degree but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 303W. Nonfiction Workshop. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: B in ENGL 211W or permission of the instructor. Intensive practice in the writing of nonfiction as an art form, with related readings. In some semesters the course may focus on one particular mode of nonfiction. May be repeated once for credit toward degree but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 304. Poetry Workshop. 3 hr. plus conf.; 3 cr. Prereq.: B in ENGL 210W or permission of the instructor. Intensive practice in the writing of poems, with related readings. May be repeated once for credit toward degree but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 310. Old English. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. An introduction to Old English prose and poetry in the original.

ENGL 311. Literature of the Anglo-Saxon Period. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Old English literature in translation studied in the context of Western European culture of the period. Fulfills Pre-Industrial and/or Non- Western Civilization LASAR requirement. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 312. Medieval Literature, 1100–1500. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The literature of Western Europe, studied principally in modern English translation. The Arthurian tradition will not be included. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 313. The Arthurian Tradition. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The historical, legendary, and literary developments from Gildas to Malory. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 320. Literature of the English Renaissance. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The new English poetry and prose (non- dramatic) of the Tudor century, as illustrated in the work of such writers as More, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Bacon, Donne, and Ben Jonson. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 321. Literature of the Seventeenth Century. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. English poetry and prose of the seventeenth century with emphasis on literary movements and such authors as Donne, Herbert, Herrick, and Milton. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 322. Literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. English poetry and prose from 1660 to 1789, from Dryden through Swift and Pope to Samuel Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, and Burns. (H1T2)

ENGL 323. The Age of Romanticism in England. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The literary, social, and philosophical expression of new views of nature and man in the earlier nineteenth century, with special emphasis on Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron, and Hazlitt. (H1T2)

ENGL 324. Victorian Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Poetry and prose of Victorian England, including such writers as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hopkins, Hardy, Pater, Ruskin, and Lewis Carroll. (H1T2)

ENGL 325. Topics in Gender and Sexualities. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. An exploration of the literature and culture of gender and sexuality. Topics may include feminist and queer theory, traditions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer writing (autobiography, fiction, poetry, etc.) or themes such as marriage, sexual and gender identity, or HIV/AIDS. This is a variable topics course, which may be taken more than once if the topic is different but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 326. Women Writers and Literary Tradition. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The study of women’s tradition, through the close reading of a selection of writings by women, primarily in English and American literature. Among the topics considered are the relationship between women writers and their cultural and social backgrounds; conditions affecting women’s literary production; the influence of female and male precursors; the impact of race and class; and continuities and breaks with the dominant literary tradition.

ENGL 327, 327W. environmental Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Writing in which nature, or the environment in general, is a significant issue; how nature has been differently conceptualized by medieval Christianity, Renaissance humanism, colonialist ex­­pansion, scientific rationalism, industrialism, and contemporary multicultural, feminist, socialist, urban, and capitalist positions; the literary, cultural, and social dimensions of the beauties, terrors, and conflicts that the global environment crisis has made us aware of today.be repeated once for credit toward degree but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 328. Topics in Children’s Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of literature written for children. Such topics as the rise of children’s and young adults’ literature as a separate discipline, changing visions of childhood and adolescence, theories of fantasy, the relationship of text to image in illustrated books, and the various controversies that have arisen around children’s literature.

ENGL 330. Chaucer: The early Works. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The dream-visions, Troilus and Criseyde, the short poems, and Boethian philosophy. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 331. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. An intensive study of Chaucer’s late work. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 332. Shakespeare I. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W or 170W or ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The comedies and histories in the first part of Shakespeare’s career to about 1600. Students electing both ENGL 332 and 333 should, if possible, take ENGL 332 first. (H1T2)

ENGL 333. Shakespeare II. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The tragedies and the dramatic romances in the latter part of Shakespeare’s career, after 1600. (H1T2)

ENGL 334. Milton. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. An intensive study of Milton’s poetry and of selections from his prose, his development as a thinker and a poet, and his place as a social philosopher. (H1T2)

ENGL 340. English Drama from its Beginnings to 1642. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. English drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from its medieval origins to the closing of the theatres in 1642. Examples of such early forms as the miracle play and the morality play will be examined, and particular attention will be paid to tragedy, tragicomedy, and satire. Playwrights studied will include figures like Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Middleton, and Beaumont and Fletcher. Conventions of the medieval, Tudor, and Stuart stage will be discussed. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 341. Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The chief English playwrights and stage developments from 1600 to 1780, including Dryden, Congreve, Steele, Gay, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. (H1T2)

ENGL 344. The English Novel I. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The origin and development of the English novel in the eighteenth century. Readings from Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Jane Austen. (H1T2)

ENGL 345. The English Novel II. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The major novelists of the nineteenth century: Dickens, Thackeray, Trollope, the Brontës, George Eliot, and Hardy; development of the novel as social criticism. (H1T2)

ENGL 346. British Fiction, 1900–1945. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Such writers as Conrad, James, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Forster, Orwell, H.G. Wells, Huxley, and Waugh. (H1T2)

ENGL 352. The American Novel to 1918. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Such writers as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Howells, James, Chopin, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather. (H1T2)

ENGL 353. American Fiction, 1918–1945. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Such writers as Gertrude Stein, Sherwood Anderson, Dos Passos, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Wright, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wolfe, and Henry Miller. (H1T2)

ENGL 354. African American Literature I (1619–1930). 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. An introduction to African-American literature from slave narratives, songs, folklore, and early poetry and fiction through the Harlem Renaissance. Major authors include Wheatley, Douglass, Dunbar, Chesnutt, Dubois, Washington, Hughes, and Toomer. (H1T2)

ENGL 355. African American Literature II (1930 to the Present). 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of modern and contemporary African-American authors, including Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Ishmael Reed, and Amiri Baraka. (H1T2)

ENGL 356. Literature of the American Indians. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of the myths, tales, and poems of native American peoples and the literature by and about Indians produced since the period of European presence.

ENGL 357. Puritanism in American Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of Puritanism in American literature from Colonial times. (H1T2)

ENGL 358. nineteenth-Century American Transcendentalism. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Literature and philosophy of the American Transcendentalists: Emerson, Thoreau, Whit- man. Countercurrents and reflections in later writers. (H1T2)

ENGL 359. Regionalism, Realism, and Naturalism in American Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) orsatisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Late nineteenth- and twentieth-century expressions of the new styles, contents, and philosophies represented by these literary movements. Such writers as Mark Twain, Faulkner, and O’Connor; Howells, Wharton, and Lewis; and Crane, Dreiser, and Farrell. (H1T2)

ENGL 361. The American Dream. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Political, social, and economic visions of America based on a selection of literature from the Puritans to the present. (H1T2)

ENGL 362. The Immigrant Experience. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. This course focuses on the large body of American literature by and about immigrants. It will include literature from a range of periods. It will explore such questions as how the literature is related to its local and global historical circumstances; how the literature dramatizes and deals with the intersection of two cultures; and how the literature contributes both to ongoing conceptualizations of American identity and to the development of American literary tradition.

ENGL 363. Studies in Global Literatures in English. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. This course studies the important literature written in English by writers in or from, for example, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India, and the Caribbean. In some semesters the course may concentrate on one particular geographical region.

ENGL 364. Studies in African Drama, Film, and Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The historical and cultural context of drama, film, orature, and anglophone literature of Africa will be studied. The course may devote attention to postcolonial literary theory, and to related work in literature of the African diaspora. Writers and directors include Achebe, Cissé, Farah, Head, Kaboré, Ngema, Ngugi, Ouedraogo, Sembenem, and Soyinka.

ENGL 365. Celtic Myth and Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of the Celtic literature of the British Isles from the age of Beowulf to the age of Chaucer, focusing primarily on the mythological and heroic sagas of Ireland and Wales. Attention is given to the relationships among Celtic, English, and continental literatures. All readings in English translation. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 366. Introduction to Irish Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A survey of great works of Irish literature from the Middle Ages to the present, with emphasis on the continuity of Irish tradition as well as on the shifting political and social contexts in which Irish literature has been produced. Readings will include Celtic saga; the literature of both Anglo-Irish ascendancy and conquered Gaelic Ireland during the long period of English rule; the poetry, drama, and fiction of the extraordinary literary revival that took place in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; and the literature of modern Ireland.

ENGL 367. Modern Irish Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) orsatisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of the three greatest modern Irish writers—Yeats, Joyce, and Beckett—in relation to Irish culture and to some of their important contemporaries and disciples, such as Synge, O’Casey, O’Connor, and O’Brien. An important focus will be the distinctively Irish nature of these writers’ materials, attitudes, and language.

ENGL 368W. Irish Writers. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Detailed study of a major writer, such as James Joyce, or of a group of writers, such as the contemporary Ulster poets, who have created a literature of considerable significance. Topic varies each semester.

ENGL 369. Asian-American Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Literature of the Asian American Diaspora, including figures such as Carlos Bulosan, Maxine Hong Kingston, Li- Young Lee, and Lois-Ann Yamanaka. Topics for investigation will include generational conflict, theoretical models of nationality and ethnicity, religion, politics, gender and sexuality, social class, and intra-ethnic disputes.

ENGL 370. British and American Drama, 1890–1945. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The development of drama in English from 1890 to the end of World War II: Wilde, Shaw, Synge, O’Casey, Odets, O’Neill, Anderson, and Wilder. (H1T2)

ENGL 371. British and American Drama, 1945 to the Present. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The development of drama in English from World War II to the present: Williams, Miller, Albee, Osborne, Beckett, Pinter, recent experimental dramatists. (H1T2)

ENGL 373. British and American Poetry, 1910–1945. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The development of poetry in English from 1910 to the end of World War II: Yeats, Pound, Frost, Eliot, Williams, Stevens, Crane, Cummings, and Auden. (H1T2)

ENGL 374. British and American Poetry, 1945 to the Present. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of Dylan Thomas, Lowell, Roethke, Larkin, Berryman, Creeley, and others associated with the trends and movements of contemporary verse. (H1T2)

ENGL 376. British and American Fiction, 1945 to the Present. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Such writers as Beckett, Graham Greene, Snow, Murdoch, Angus Wilson, Anthony Powell, the English working-class novelists, Doris Lessing, Mailer, Bellow, Nabokov, Baldwin, Ellison, Malamud, and Barth. (H1T2)

ENGL 377. Modern South Asian Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR. A study of literatures written primarily in English and in translation by authors from the South Asian subcontinent since the 19th century. Themes include colonization/decolonization, nationalism, exile, and migration. Authors may include Rabindranath Tagore, V.S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Mahashweta Devi, and Arundhati Roy.

ENGL 378. Topics in Caribbean Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR. An exploration of the literature, history, and culture of the Caribbean region, ranging from colonization and slavery to contemporary formations of identity and self. Topics include creolization, carnival, gender politics, maroonage, and discourses of exile. This is a variable topics course, which may be taken more than once if the topic is different but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 379. Topics in Transnational/Postcolonial Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR. An exploration of the literatures, theory, and cultures of postcolonial and/or transnational conditions. Topics include border crossings, cosmopolitanism, multinationalism, globalization, nationhood and nationalism, diaspora, and migration. Themes may include translation, travel, displacement, memory, home, labor, social justice, and global cities. This is a variable topics course, which may be taken more than once if the topic is different but may be applied only once to the major.

ENGL 380. Classical Backgrounds of English Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of selected works of Greek and Latin literature in translation in relation to the development of English literature. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 381. The Literature of the Bible. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A study of Biblical literature in English translation: its forms and themes, literary and historical meaning, and its influence on English and American literature. Cannot be taken for credit if student has taken ENGL 153. (H1T2, PN)

ENGL 382. Aspects of Literary Criticism. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A selection of critical texts illustrating approaches to literary criticism. Works of literature will be analyzed according to these approaches. (H3)

ENGL 383. Aspects of Poetry. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A wide reading in British and American poetry of various periods, together with appropriate critical selections, dealing with poetic theory and practice. (H1T2)

ENGL 384. Aspects of Fiction. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Representative British and American novels and criticism of fiction. The course deals with such topics as romance, the novel of manners, realism, and stream-of-consciousness. (H1T2)

ENGL 385. Aspects of Drama. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. A selection of representative plays and criticism. The theory and practice of drama as reflected in tragedy, comedy, and other major forms. (H1T2)

ENGL 386. Literature and Religion. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Religious ideas and experiences in literature. Such writers as the Pearl poet, Donne, Milton, Bunyan, Blake, Melville, Hopkins, and Eliot. (H3)

ENGL 387. Literature and Politics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Relationship of literature and politics. Such topics as revolution and reaction, images of kinship and government, utopian and apocalyptic visions, and Marxism and Existentialism. (H3)

ENGL 388. Literature and Psychology. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The relationship of literature and psychology is studied through readings in psychological theories and literary works. (H3)

ENGL 389. Myth and Archetype in Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The study of myth and archetype in ancient and modern literature with consideration of such writers as Frazer, Jung, Frye, and Lévi-Strauss.

ENGL 390. Comedy and Satire. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. Selected studies in comic fiction, drama, and satire. This course will investigate the origin and development of comedy and satire and their relation to ritual and social custom. It will consider dramatic modes, such as comedy of manners, farce, and theatre of the absurd as well as stock characters such as the trickster, the comic hero, and the clown. It will also consider the historic relationship between comedy and tragedy and the ways in which gender and cultural experience have shaped our perceptions of the comic.

ENGL 391W. Senior Seminar: Topics in Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: English major with senior status or consent of the instructor. This course allows the instructor and a small group of advanced English majors to pursue in depth a topic in literature or literary theory.

ENGL 395, 395W. Selected Studies in Literature. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 165W (formerly ENGL 140W) or 170W (formerly ENGL 150W) or satisfaction of the Humanities I, Tier 1 LASAR requirement. The topic of the course, announced in advance, varies each semester. The course may be taken for credit more than once if the topic is different. (H1T2)

ENGL 397. Seminar in Teaching Writing. 4 hr.; 4 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the department and junior or senior standing. Students participate in teaching ENGL 110 with an instructor. Work includes planning and giving lessons, holding conferences, commenting on students’ papers, and attending a weekly workshop. This course may be taken twice but applied only once to the major.

ENGL 399W. Department Honors Seminar. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Enrollment in the English Department’s Honors Program. This seminar, required of department Honors candidates, is organized around a broad theme, often interdisciplinary, and includes individual research projects, which are presented at a student conference in the Spring. The seminar is taken twice, in the Fall and Spring of the same academic year, and this two-semester sequence counts toward the requirements for Honors in English. Three credits of 399W replace the senior seminar required for the major, and the additional three credits replace one of the six electives for the major.

 

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