Navigate Up
Sign In

Login to ...

  
A-Z Index
Home > About Queens College > Administration > Provost and VP for Academic Affairs
Provost and VP for Academic Affairs
Admissions
Provost and VP for Academic Affairs
People
College P&B
Assessment
Accreditation
Resources
Tenure, Promotion, CCE

 

 New Courses and Variable Topics Courses

 
Below is a listing of new or variable topics (VT) courses for the fall 2017 semester, i.e., courses that have not been offered in recent years, or that address a new topic as listed below. New listings are being added, so be sure to check back before you register for fall courses.

Register for these new courses on CUNYfirst. If you have questions about your course plan, please contact Academic Advising at 718-997-5599 or advising@qc.cuny.edu​.

ANTH 239: Topics in Cultural Anthropology: Law, (Il)legality, and (In)equality

3 cr, 3 hr, Web-enhanced Tuesday, Thursday, 3:10 PM to 4:25 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Is the law inherently skewed in favor of the ruling classes or is it a neutral tool that could be utilized to empower oppressed sectors of the population? Why are minorities, indigenous populations, and undocumented immigrants disproportionately criminalized and rendered illegal? The goal of the course is to expose students to critical approaches to the study of law in anthropology and cognate fields in a manner that does not take claims about “legality” and the “rule of law” at face value. We will be interrogating assumptions about the nature and the uses of the law by examining these three main themes: what law is, how are notions of legality and illegality constructed, and the relationship between law and (in)equality. We will be looking at the law not only as a set of procedures and institutions but also as a popular resource that is invoked at different scales (community, national, global) and under varied historical, political, and economic conditions such as colonialism, post-colonialism, and neoliberalism to produce multiple and sometimes contradictory outcomes to either entrench or disrupt structures of inequality.

ANTH 279: Topics in Biological Anthropology: Faunal Analysis

3 cr, 3 hr, Web-enhanced Students inspecting bones Tuesday, Thursday, 10:45 AM to 12:00 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

This hands-on course will give students the training in the study of animal bones from archaeological and paleontological sites. It will begin with a broad survey of animal skeletal and dental anatomy. Students will be involved in hands-on identification of animal bones and will learn how to describe damage from variety of natural processes, such as weathering, butchering with stone tools, cooking, and carnivore feeding.

BIOL 45: Microbiology for Health Professions

4 cr, 0 hr, In person Thursday, 10:05 AM to 11:55 AM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Microbiology with emphases on characteristics, natural history, and handling of human pathogens. This course is designed for students planning to enter into professional nursing program and other health professions. Bio 45 is a 4-credit, non-majors Biology course with both lecture and laboratory components (2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours per week).

CMLIT 100: Writing about Literature

Clouds over water

3 cr, 0 hr, In person Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 1:00 PM to 4:18 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Flexible Core: Creative Expression

This course fulfills the College Writing 2 requirements and builds on the work of English 110 (College Writing 1) in order to teach the conventions of writing in the discipline of Comparative Literature. Students will be reading, researching and writing about global literatures. As in English 110, students will increase their knowledge of the grammar and mechanics of Standard English, expand their vocabulary, and learn how to conduct research and improve their analytical skills. The course is designed to train students to read critically, think analytically and develop strategies to become effective writers who will meet the demands not only of academic writing, but also of the increasingly competitive social media environment that requires proficient writing skills.

The literary works of diverse backgrounds that will be considered in the course reflect the ways consciousness is portrayed in literature in the past two centuries, a period of accelerated progress whose inevitable impact on the creative process of writing has led to intensely confessional narratives that illuminate the deepest corners of the self. We will read Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself” from Leaves of Grass; Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse; and selections from Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle, Vol. 1.

The course will operate as a workshop encouraging each student individually to master the technicalities of writing, use rhetorical strategies and develop the writing voice we all need in order to write with authority and persuasion. Moreover, students will study the parameters of a genre. We will explore the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction, as well as the distinction between prose and verse and how poetry, as the earliest form of oral tradition and writing, has influenced the language of most genres of prose. Additionally, the instruction will cover building character, story and style, the development of dialogue, and the practice of revision.

CMLIT 229W: CMLIT 229W

3 cr, 3 hr, Hybrid (33-80% online) Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 9:30 AM to 12:48 AM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Flexible Core: World Cultures & Global Issues

We will be reading the works of three contemporary women writers-- Elena Ferrante, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Toni Morrison-- who are famous for their innovative approach to the novel. Their works explore class migration and cultural identity conflicts, and weave global with local concerns, emphasizing the importance of place and community. We will explore these topics in a QC blog and during in-class meetings, and you will be responsible for a digitally-enhanced research project which you will work on in stages.

DRAM 211: Scenic Design I

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Students on stage Monday, 1:40 PM to 4:30 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

This class introduces you to the art of scenic design for theater. Perfect for students who want to explore art, sculpture, and/or theater




DRAM 213: Costume Design I

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Students in costume design shop Monday, 1:40 PM to 4:30 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

This amazing course explores the fundamentals of costume design. Perfect for theater, fashion, or arts students.






MEDST 381 and 769: Technology Development Lab

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Rushkoff with students Wednesday, 1:40 PM to 4:30 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

In this studio course, digital pioneer Douglas Rushkoff will help participants bring their own technology concepts from the idea stage to full proposals and prototypes. Each week, guest industry experts will help students explore precedents and influences, choose platforms, develop user scenarios, determine market fit, write wireframes, evaluate social, economic, and environmental impact, prepare and rehearse proposals, build prototypes, and then participate in a live pitch before a panel of funders and technologists. Up to three projects will be invited to participate as members of QC’s new Technology Incubator. Open to the entire college community: all majors, undergraduates, graduates, and faculty. Participation in this course is by instructor permission only. email drushkoff@qc.cuny.edu

PHIL 250: Plato and the Bible

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Ancient Greek cosmology: a geocentric spherical universe. Tuesday, Thursday, 10:45:00 AM to 12:00:00 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Readings from the ancient Greek philosopher Plato, studied alongside selections from the Hebrew Bible, the Christian New Testament, the Jewish Neo-Platonist philosopher Philo, and the early Christian theologian, Origen.







PSCI 102: Current Political Controversies

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesd​ay, Thursday, 1:40 PM to 2:55 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Technology, the Internet & Politics

PSCI 102: Current Political Controversies

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesday, Thursday, 3:10 PM to 4:25 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Social Networks & the Arab Spring

PSCI 102: Current Political Controversies

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Wednesday, 6:30 PM to 9:20 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Causes & Consequences of Civil War: Insurgents, Terrorists, Violence

PSCI 209: Special Topics in Political Science

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesday, Thursday, 3:10 PM to 4:25 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Politics of Immigration

PSCI 229: Colloquim in American Politics

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesday, Thursday, 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Our Spies, the CIA, & American Democracy

PSCI 249: Colloquim in Comparative Politics

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Monday, Wednesday, 3:10 PM to 4:25 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Authoritarianism: Coercion and Corruption

PSCI 252: Contemporary Issues in International Relations

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesday, Thursday, 1:40 PM to 2:55 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Globalization & its Discontents: Cooperation & Conflict

PSCI 252: Comtemporary Issues in International Relations

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Monday, 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

The International Politics of South Asia

PSCI 289: Colloquium in Law and Politics

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesday, Thursday, 1:40 PM to 2:55 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Intro to Law and Society

PSCI 289: Colloquium in Law and Politics

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesday, Thursday, 3:10 PM to 4:25 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

Censorship & the 1st Amendment

URBST 132: Health Services & Policy

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Monday, 9:10 AM to 12:00 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

An introduction to the structure and function of institutions that provide personal and public health service. The course analyzes public policy issues, including educational licensing and the financing and regulation of health care services.

URBST 231: Cities and Social Medicine

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Friday, 9:10 AM to 12:00 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

This course explores social medicine and urban health. Social medicine is knowledge about the economic, social, environmental and political factors that shape the health of individuals and communities. The course discusses the specific cases of diet, food systems and health and the rising levels of opioid addiction in the US, and the public policies that seek to reduce disparities in health status, including the role of community mobilization around these issues. We will focus on both health disparities and programs to reduce them within the New York City metropolitan area.

URBST 265: Union Organizing

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Thursday, 6:30 PM to 9:20 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

This course will survey the history and development of labor organizing strategy from the 19th to the 21st centuries. We will explore the special challenges that unions face in the 21st century to gain new members and win new rights and benefits for working families.

URBST 265W: Political Economy of Food

3 cr, 3 hr, In person Tuesday, Thursday, 1:40 PM to 2:55 PM

General Education (Pathways) Requirement: Not a general education course

How is the food grown, processed and distributed and at what costs to people, animals and the environment? This course introduces the political economy of food systems including feeding cities, industrial agriculture, famine and obesity. Readings and assignments “follow food” as a way to understand and consider the interrelated, historical, structural engagements of modern food systems.

​​
 

 Office Information

 

CUNY Queens College
65-30 Kissena Blvd.
Queens, NY 11367-1597

Kiely Hall, 11th Floor

Office Hours: 

Monday - Friday:  9:00 AM - 5:00 PM


+1 718 997 5900 (Voice)
+1 718 997 5879 (Fax)

http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Provost


 

 Links

 
 
 
Stay Social at QC YouTube Facebook Twitter Gray Bar Calendar MyQC QC Mobile CUNY first Blackboard QC Bookstore

Click each division to view a complete list of its departments


Adult Collegiate Education | English Language Institute | Professional & Continuing Studies
Summer Session | Weekend College | Winter Session



Resources for Combating Sexual Harassment/Sexual Assault (Title IX)

Queens College is CUNY
DirectionsMap  |  Emergency Preparedness  |  Working at QC  |  Student Consumer Info  |  A-Z Index  | 
Queens College, CUNY | 65-30 Kissena Blvd. | Queens, NY 11367-1597 | Phone: (718) 997-5000 Copyright © 2004-