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Should Nature Matter to New Yorkers? Phillip Lopate And Other Writers Tackle This Question Dec. 2

Contact:

Phyllis Cohen Stevens
Deputy Director of News Services
phyllis.cohen-stevens@qc.cuny.edu

(718) 997-5597

Maria Matteo
News Assistant
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu
(718) 997-5593

SHOULD NATURE MATTER TO NEW YORKERS?
-- Phillip Lopate and Other Prominent Natural and Urban History Writers
Address This Question at December 2 Conference --

WHAT: “Nature and New York,” the first conference to be sponsored by CIRCE, the CUNY Institute for Research on the City Environment at Queens College (founded with major financial support by Theodore Kheel and the Nurture Nature Foundation). Author presentations; panel discussion; audience Q&A. For details, see http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/nnyn/conference/attend.html
WHEN: Friday, Dec. 2, 2005, 9 am – 4 pm, with reception to follow
PRICE: $20 for early registration, which includes coffee, lunch and reception. Register at http://www.yourleague.com/coursecode?nny100. Registration at the door: $30.
WHERE: LeFrak Concert Hall, Queens College, Flushing, NY
For directions, please visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/directions.php
WHO:

Prominent writers on nature and the city:
Tony Hiss, The Experience of Place; co-author, Highlands to Ocean Report
William Kornblum, At Sea in the City
Mark Kurlansky, Cod, Salt, and The Big Oyster: New York on the Half Shell
(forthcoming)
Phillip Lopate, Waterfront: A Walk Around Manhattan and Seaport: New York’s Vanished Waterfront
Anne Matthews, Wild Nights: Nature Returns to the City
David Rosane, The Nature of New York (forthcoming)
Robert Sullivan, Rats and the Meadowlands: Wilderness Adventures at the Edge of a City

WHY: Nature plays a special role in the life of New York City. Indeed, it may be that the compromising of nature here magnifies its importance. How aware are New Yorkers of their present-day biological riches and their historical losses? How important is the persistence of nature in New York to the physical and psychological well-being of its populace? How do New Yorkers experience and perceive nature? In a metropolis, is the natural unnatural, and what are the boundaries between natural and artificial manifestations of nature? And is there a dark side to nature in New York? In a city with red-tailed hawks, ladybugs, rabbits, pigeons, and rats, should nature be embraced or avoided?


 
 

 Office Information

 
Deputy Director of News Services
(Position vacant)

(718) 997- 5597
  

Maria Matteo
Assistant Director of News Services
Queens Hall, Room 270B

maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu
(718) 997-5593

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