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Artist Who Persevered Through ALS Diagnosis and Learned to Paint with His Left Hand to Exhibit Work Beginning May 1

--“Palaemon: A Survey of Paintings by Jon Imber,” Spans the Artist’s 35-Year Career--

FLUSHING, N.Y., April 26, 2013—The Godwin-Ternbach Museum is pleased to announce an exhibition of painter Jon Imber’s work. This display of over 40 paintings, on display through June 15, celebrates 35 years of discovery and experimentation, moving from images of figuration through landscape to abstraction. An opening reception will take place on Saturday, May 11, from 3–5 pm, with a dialogue between Imber and former MOMA curator Deborah Wye.
 
This exhibition marks a return to New York for Imber. Born in Nassau County, NY in 1950 and educated at Cornell University, Imber began his career with landscape paintings and drawings of upstate New York.

Although diagnosed last year with ALS, a neurodegenerative disorder, Imber persevered and trained himself to paint with his left hand. The most recent paintings on exhibit were made in this manner. In some of the newest work, Imber has returned to portraits, examining mortality and legacy through images of relationships between father, son, and mentor.

After graduating with an MFA from Boston University in 1977, where he studied with Philip Guston, Imber was offered his first important show at Brandeis University’s Rose Art Museum in 1978. Shortly after, he started exhibiting at Nielsen Gallery, Boston’s top gallery. He received rave reviews, numerous awards, and was sought after by museums and collectors. Rather than resting on the success of his figurative paintings, Imber decided to tackle new material and new subject matter. His focus shifted to portraits, then to large, studio landscapes, then to figures in landscapes, then to plein air landscapes, and finally to landscapes on the edge of abstraction. Throughout these changes he has maintained a unique style of gestural brush strokes and an intimate sense of knowing his subject that goes beyond observation.
Imber_morning at windswept-resized.jpg
Imber’s work references not only the Abstract Expressionists of the last century but also
artists of the 16th-century Venetian School, with their mastery of light and color. The artist’s
influences range broadly from Cezanne and Van Gogh to the frescoes at Pompeii, from medieval
cathedral sculpture to Matisse and Beckman. Like the Venetians and the Impressionists, Imber believes in color over design. With his judicious application of paint, using the processes of layering and blending, as well as scraping away, Imber achieves images alive with glowing richness. His influences reflect the tensions he plays with in his own work: personal vision versus the material of paint, content versus form.

Imber’s credits include teaching at the Rhode Island School of Design, School of Visual Arts in NYC, Massachusetts College of Art, and Harvard University, where he has taught drawing for 27 years. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and acquired by major collectors, cultural institutions, and corporations, including the Fogg Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the New Orleans Museum of Art, and the U.S. State Department. The Alpha Gallery in Boston, Greenhut Gallery in Portland, Maine, and Watson Gallery in Stonington, Maine represent the artist.

An essay by poet and essayist William Corbett accompanies the exhibition. An online catalogue will be published and available on the museum’s website and at jonimber.com. 
For further information about the exhibition and programs, call 718-997-4747 or visit qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/godwin_ternbach. Exhibition entry and public programs are free.

The exhibition was curated by Elizabeth Hoy and organized by the Godwin-Ternbach Museum and the Friends of the Godwin-Ternbach Museum.

The museum is open Monday through Thursday and Saturday 11 am to 5 pm. Its schedule reflects the college’s academic calendar. It is closed during college recesses and holidays. Call 718-997-4747 to verify dates of current and upcoming exhibitions and events.

By car, the Godwin-Ternbach Museum is 30 minutes from midtown Manhattan. Directions are at
www.qc.cuny.edu/directions.

The Godwin-Ternbach Museum, a part of the Kupferberg Center for the Visual and Performing Arts at Queens College, is the only comprehensive collection of art and artifacts in the borough of Queens, housing over 5,000 objects that date from ancient to modern times. The mission of the GTM has grown over time from serving as a teaching museum for the benefit of art and art history students to embracing all disciplines and an increasingly diverse and engaged community. All exhibitions are free, as are their related lectures, symposia, gallery talks, workshops, films, concerts, and tours.

For more about Queens College visit
www.qc.cuny.edu.
The Godwin-Ternbach Museum, a part of Queens College’s Kupferberg Center for the Visual and Performing Arts, presents historical and contemporary exhibitions and programs that provide significant educational opportunities and dynamic aesthetic experiences to residents of the borough of Queens and neighboring Manhattan and Long Island. As the only collection of art and artifacts in the borough, housing over 5,000 objects that date from ancient to modern times, the museum introduces many individuals to art and artifacts they might not otherwise encounter. The breadth of these holdings, and the rich resources of the college, allow presentations that enlighten audiences about art and culture—their own traditions and histories and the American scene. Lectures, symposia, gallery talks, workshops, films, concerts, and tours as well as digital displays, catalogues and an active website, complement and interpret the art on view. All exhibitions and programs are free.

 
 

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