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Center for Byzantine & Modern Greek Studies

Course Listing for Spring 2014

Center for Byzantine & Modern Greek Studies                 
Spring 2014   


GRKST 100 Modern Greek Culture & Civilization

CODE 45505 Wednesdays 1:40-4:30pm
Credits 3            Room TBA
Prof. Nicos Alexiou
This course will survey major cultural practices, intellectual pursuits and ideological currents from the post-Byzantine to the present period. The emergence and development of a modern Greek identity will be examined from an interdisciplinary perspective. Interactions between the sphere of culture and other social spheres, the relation between popular culture and the arts, and the conflicting representations of a “national culture” are among the general themes to be specifically pursued in relation to modern Greece.
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ARTH 752.1 Seminar in Medieval Art
CODE 38005 Tuesdays 6:00-7:40 pm
Credits 3         Klapper Hall 403
Prof. Warren Woodfin
Study of the arts of the Middle Ages in general, and Byzantium in particular, has long been dominated by attention to works made for the Church. This bias in part reflects the disproportionate number of sacred works that have been preserved relative to secular ones, but some scholars have even questioned whether one can speak of such a category as the “the secular” in Byzantine society, dominated as it was by the twin powers of the Orthodox Church and the imperial hierarchy. In contrast, recent work in Byzantine Art history has uncovered evidence of a thriving secular tradition in art, one at times even engaging in direct parody of religious and imperial modes of artistic presentation. Focusing on the Middle and Late Byzantine periods (843-1453), this seminar will take a two-pronged approach to the material. In the following weeks, we will turn to case studies of secular works in various media: architecture, textiles, ivories, manuscripts, metalwork, and enamels. In their seminar papers, students should work to come up with an original application of the approaches presented in this class-or another methodology of their own choosing-to a work or group of works from Byzantium. Research on works of art in local collections (e.g., the Morgan Library and Museum or the Metropolitan Museum of Art) is particularly encouraged.
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HIST 210  The Byzantine Empire, 1025-1453
CODE: 39277  Tuesdays  3:10-5:50 pm
Credits 3      Razran 109
Prof. Garedakis
From the Empire’s apogee to its fall; the crusades and the dismemberment of the Empire; last recovery; conquest by the Ottoman Turks.
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GRKMD 41W Modern Greek Literature in Translation
CODE 54143 Mon & Wed   7:45-9:00 am
Credits 3          Rathaus 208
Prof. Gerasimus Katsan

Surveys Modern Greek literature in translation from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. The authors and their works are examined not only for their individual stylistic and thematic elements but also within the context of European literary and cultural movements. (H1T2)
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GRKMD 41W Modern Greek Literature in Translation
CODE 42635 Tues & Thurs 5:00-6:15 pm
Credits 3          Rathaus 208
Prof. Eleni Natsiopoulou
Surveys Modern Greek literature in translation from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. The authors and their works are examined not only for their individual stylistic and thematic elements but also within the context of European literary and cultural movements. (H1T2)
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GRKMD 111 Elementary Modern Greek I
CODE 42637 Tues & Thurs 8:00-9:50 am
Credits 4          King 107
Prof. Gerasimus Katsan
Prereq.: Permission of the department. Intended for students with no previous knowledge of Modern Greek. Designed to establish correct pronunciation, to teach the elements of grammar, to enable students to understand written and spoken Greek, to become familiar with cultural aspects of Modern Greece and especially to establish a good basic vocabulary.
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GRKMD 203 Intermediate Modern Greek I
CODE 42638 Tues & Thurs 3:10-4:25 pm
Credits 3          King 210
Prof. Eleni Natsiopoulou
Prereq.: GRKMD 112 or equivalent, or permission of the department. Continuation of GRKMD 112 with grammar review, conversation and readings in literary and cultural materials at an intermediate level.
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GRKMD 305 Modern Greek Literature I
CODE 42639 Tues & Thurs 12:15-1:30 pm
Credits 3         King 107
Prof. Gerasimus Katsan
Prereq.: GRKMD 204 or equivalent, or permission of the department. A course designed to improve the literary vocabulary and writing skills of students by a close reading of various literary texts.  (H1T2) TAUGHT IN GREEK
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HNRS 126W The Peopling of New York
CODE 38684 Tues & Thurs 12:15-1:30 pm
Credits 3         Honors Hall 12
Prof. Christos P. Ioannides
Prereq.: HNRS 125 and student must be in the Macaulay Honors College at Queens College.
The course will examine the role of immigration and migration in shaping the past, present, and future identity of New York City. Topics include the ways religion, race, ethnicity, and gender influence immigrant experiences; the formation and social organization of various communities; and their impact of newcomers on urban culture and politics. Students will work in teams to conduct research on specific communities. The focus will be on Astoria which has the largest concentration of Greeks than anywhere in the U.S. In addition to studying the Greeks in this area of Queens,  we will also examine the Brazilian community in Astoria, relative newcomers in this ethnically mixed neighborhood. Field trips to Astoria will be part of the course. We will also utilize the Year of Brazil program at Queens College.
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HIST 242 Modern Greek History, 1923 to the Present
CODE 39284 Tues & Thurs 10:45-12:00 pm
Credits 3          Razran 109
Prof. Theodore Theoharis
Political, social, economic, and intellectual development in post-1923 Greece, as well as the role of the Greek state in world politics.
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URBST 340W The Greek American Community in the New York/Queens,  Astoria area.  Political, Social and Cultural Dynamics.
CODE 32261 Tues. & Thurs. 10:45  -12:00pm
Credits 3         Powdermaker Hall 253
Prof. Christos P. Ioannides
This course will revolve around a research project on the Greek American community in the New York/Queens and Astoria area where most Greeks reside. The course is designed to encourage students to conduct research on political, social, cultural, educational and economic attributes of the Greek American community. Students will be guided to construct a questionnaire that will reflect each student’s particular interest (politics, sociology, education, and economics).
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GRKST 390 TUTORIAL
CODE 45508 *****Hours to be announced*******
Credits 3
Staff--Upper Junior /Senior status required.



                                                          For more information please contact:
                                                          Center for Byzantine &
                                                          Modern Greek Studies
                                                          By phone: 718-997-4520 &
                                                          By e-mail: qc.byzantine.center@gmail.com

      

 
 

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