Sign In

Login to ...

  
A-Z Index
Home > Academics > Divisions > Arts and Humanities > Media Studies > MA in Media Studies
MA in Media Studies

Students working with computers

Courses

The Media Studies Graduate Program courses are best thought of as subject areas under which more particular courses are devised, based on current student and faculty goals and work. Form & Genre, for example, can mean an Interactive Narrative Lab one semester, and an exploration of the Gnostic tradition in Technology another. Media and Politics could cover political campaigns, the changing relationship of government to the fourth estate, the state of citizen media, or all three.

Courses are limited to 12 students, and meet once a week for two hours. Each class is supplemented by a practicum, supervised lab, or conference hour where the instructor supports students in their own research pursuits as they intersect with the general topic area of the course. These practicums are in the spirit of English "supervisions" or "tutorials," and are driven as much by the goals of the students as those of the instructors.

In addition to our own courses, you will also have access to the full range of courses in all Queens College graduate programs, as well as the newly formed CUNY Media and Digital Studies Consortium, which offers relevant courses in theory, practice, art, technology, media literacy, digital games, and data visualization from the other colleges and universities in the CUNY system.

The full course listings are below. Students may take a particular course more than once if it is covering a different topic within that subject area. All students are required to take Media and Social Justice and Capitalism and Media, among other program requirements.

 

Spring 2018 Courses 

MEDST 701: Media Archeology 
Professor Amy Herzog
Wednesday 6:30 to 8:20 PM, Room G-200

Media archaeology is an emergent field, one that excavates the histories of contemporary media via neglected and often-obsolete practices. It is an approach that is at once deeply rooted in the materiality of media technologies, and attuned to the social and political sites in which they circulate. This project-based seminar will survey the key texts that have driven this archaeological turn in media studies, with a critical perspective on new ways the past can shed light on our current conditions. Sites of consumption and exhibition will prove central to our practice, which will involve mapping the shifting relations among technologies, users, and urban space.

MEDST 703: Media & Social Justice 
Professor Roopali Mukherjee 
Tuesdays 6:30 to 8:20 PM, Room G200

MA core course that examines a variety of approaches to media as agents of political, economic, and social change with an emphasis on historical struggles over social justice. Topics introduce a long and vibrant history of media activism ranging from the earliest influences of Thomas Paine's revolutionary pamphlet, Common Sense, to the continuing role of media within significant labor, antiwar, civil rights, and anti-globalization struggles. Critically examining a variety of modes of resistance – from non-violent civil disobedience to revolutionary Marxism, from small acts of sabotage to the networked tactics of guerrilla warfare – the course is geared to understanding how those with little or no power manage, nevertheless, to destabilize and sometimes topple powerful institutions of oppression, injustice, and exploitation.

MEDST 759: Studies in Communication: Technology, Media and Democracy - Assessing the Threats to an Informed Electorate 
Professor Douglas Rushkoff 
Mondays 6:30-9:30 pm, various locations in Manhattan

A collaboration between Cornell Tech, Columbia, NYU, The New School and QC Media Studies to understand the various threats to journalism and media, and attempt to address these challenges using design, engineering, and computational methods and techniques. From leaders inciting violence and hurling insults to technology platforms siphoning revenue, independent journalism has increasingly been under attack. The program, including the course, lecture series, and research and development activities, will address key challenges faced by independent media including: security and cybersecurity threats to news organizations and journalists; credibility and reliability threats including fake news and discrediting campaigns; obstacles and challenges in conducting and funding investigative journalism; and the shifting business models and income sources that threaten both local and national news organizations and coverage.
This class will meet Monday evenings, gathering together participants from the five graduate programs at one of the campuses - usually in Manhattan. The semester will conclude with a day-long workshop and press conference on a Friday or Saturday. 

MEDST 791: Thesis Research 
Professor Mara Einstein 
Tuesday 4p - 6p
For students to narrow focus, develop a research question, explore research methodologies, write a thesis proposal and conduct literature survey (or the equivalent) for the thesis project. 

Additional Electives: 

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Creative Sound Production 
Stephen Bartolomei 
Thu 9:10 am - 1 pm
A study of sound as a creative medium in theory and practice. The class involves a study of motion picture soundtracks, sound art works, radio broadcasts, historical recordings, as well as hands on sound recording and editing using new computer technologies. 

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Podcasting Production  
Stephen Bartolomei
Tuesday 9:10am - 1pm  Podcasting planning, content, and production. 

 

Fall 2017 Courses 

MEDST 702: Capitalism & Media 
Professor Matt Crain 
Wednesday 6:30 to 8:20 PM, Room G-200

Seminar offers an intensive introduction to global capitalism and its relation to established and contemporary media systems. This is primarily a theory course that will teach graduate students to understand, analyze and research the diverse forms of governance, cultural power, knowledge, public policy, and resistance associated with media as they shape, and are shaped by race, class, and gender politics.

MEDST 752: Media Theory (3 cr.; 2 plus conf. hour)
Professor JV Fuqua 
Tuesday 6:30 to 8:20 PM, Room G-200
Media theory examines the relationship among media, culture, and technologies. Media theories are tools that can be used by scholars, activists, artists, and others to help us explain the ways power is established and contested through cultural artifacts. This course provides an introductory overview to some of the most significant theoretical contributions to 20th and 21st- century critical thought and an examination of how these theories have been taken up by makers and activists for social change. This course shows the connections between theory and practice, analog and digital media. Grounded in a cultural studies approach to the study of "the culture industries" and social justice, we will examine psychoanalysis, Marxist critical theory, semiotics/structuralism, poststructuralism/postmodernism, feminist and queer theory, postcolonial theory, critical race theory as well as digital theory, science and technology studies (STS), and recent ways of responding to "the posthuman."

MEDST 769: Digital Hacktivism: Technology Development Lab
Professor Douglas Rushkoff
Wednesday 1:40 to 4:30pm, Room G-200 and G Building Basement Lab
Full scholarships available for up to five masters students. 

In this studio course, participants bring their own technology concepts from the idea stage to full proposals and prototypes. Each week, guest industry experts will help students explore precedents and influences, choose platforms, develop user scenarios, determine market fit, write wireframes, evaluate social, economic, and environmental impact, prepare and rehearse proposals, build prototypes, and then participate in a live pitch before a panel of funders and technologists. Up to three projects will be invited to participate as members of QC's new Technology Incubator. For department masters students, the focus will be on the impact of technology design on economic and social justice. Masters students may also do scholarly work on these issues instead of technology development. Web announcement.

MEDST 759: Studies in Communication: Media, Manipulation, and Magick
Professor Douglas Rushkoff
Mondays 6:30 to 8:20pm
G-200

This seminar will explore the relationship between influence techniques, media technology, and the occult: From the radio sigils of Aleister Crowley and Adolf Hitler to the occult rituals of Jack Parsons and L Ron Hubbard; the cut-and-paste of Gysin and Burroughs to the charging of corporate sigils; and from the psychedelic origins of the internet to the magical intentions of Pepe the Frog. We will compare and contrast the digital influence techniques of BJ Fogg, Nir Eyal, and Cambridge Analytica with the viral hacktivism of the YesMen and Anonymous.  We will explore magick-influenced cultural phenomena Burning Man to anti-Trump binding spells, and choose individual lines of scholarship or praxis. 

Additional Electives: 

ARTS 370-VT: Special Topics in Design: Data Visualization
Professor Danne Woo
Fridays, 2:00PM – 5:50PM
I-Building 213

The massive amounts of data that we produce as a culture is steadily rising year after year. This ever-growing sea of information needs to be understood. Since we are all naturally visual people, the best way to understand this data is to graphically interpret it as data visualizations.  Over the course of this semester we will cover this entire process. First sourcing publicly available data sets. Then analyzing these data sets to pull out the points of interest. And finally designing visualizations based on our findings for a specific audience. The first portion of the semester will be focused on printed infographics and the second half will be entirely interactive interpretations of the data using HTML5.

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Creative Sound Production 
Stephen Bartolomei 
Thu 9:10 am - 1 pm

A study of sound as a creative medium in theory and practice. The class involves a study of motion picture soundtracks, sound art works, radio broadcasts, historical recordings, as well as hands on sound recording and editing using new computer technologies. 

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Podcasting Production 
Stephen Bartolomei
Tuesday 9:10am - 1pm 

Podcasting planning, content, and production. 

 

Previous Semester Courses

Spring 2017 Courses 

MEDST 702: Capitalism & Media
Professor Matt Crain
Wednesdays 6:30 to 8:20 PM, Room G200

Seminar offers an intensive introduction to global capitalism and its relation to established and contemporary media systems. This is primarily a theory course that will teach graduate students to understand, analyze and research the diverse forms of governance, cultural power, knowledge, public policy, and resistance associated with media as they shape, and are shaped by race, class, and gender politics.

MEDST 703: Media & Social Justice
Professor Roopali Mukherjee
Mondays 6:30 to 8:20 PM, Room G200

MA core course that examines a variety of approaches to media as agents of political, economic, and social change with an emphasis on historical struggles over social justice. Topics introduce a long and vibrant history of media activism ranging from the earliest influences of Thomas Paine's revolutionary pamphlet, Common Sense, to the continuing role of media within significant labor, antiwar, civil rights, and anti-globalization struggles.​ Critically examining a variety of modes of resistance – from non-violent civil disobedience to revolutionary Marxism, from small acts of sabotage to the networked tactics of guerrilla warfare – the course is geared to understanding how those with little or no power manage, nevertheless, to destabilize and sometimes topple powerful institutions of oppression, injustice, and exploitation.

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Media and the Environment
Professor JV Fuqua
Tuesdays 6:30 to 8:20 PM, Room G200

This course examines how our perceptions of human and natural environments are framed by technologies and how those same technologies are used by media activists to intervene inchallenge, and change the larger cultural and political contexts of our environment. We will engage with an array of media including photography, film, digital forms and technologies, maps, illustrations, sound, and use both narrative (fiction) and documentary (nonfiction) texts. It addresses the materiality of media technologies and their role in contemporary extraction capital and global precarity. These issues will be addressed using theoretical groundings in historical theory as well as contemporary theories (new feminist materialism, critical race theory, queer theory, critical animal studies). Key concepts include but are not limited to: nature, the nonhuman, wilderness, agribusiness, environmental racism, extinction, the anthropocene, rewilding, domestication, deforestation, extraction capital, desertification, petrochemical cultures, animality, postcoloniality, purity/toxicity, consumerism, urban/rural, e-waste, and technological obsolescence.

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Interactive Narrative
Professor Douglas Rushkoff
Wednesdays 3:00p to 5:00p, Room G200

This hybrid seminar/lab considers the impact of interactivity on traditional narrative structure, and explores new methods for conveying narrative in non-linear, digital, and augmented forms of art, entertainment, and communications. How can we create the experiences of reversal, recognition, and catharsis in interactive contexts - and do we want to? What are the social and political biases implicit in particular narrative structures, and how are they changing in new media landscapes?   Each class meeting is broken up into two parts. The first is a seminar discussion either examining an aspect of traditional narrative and the way it is threatened or rendered obsolete in an interactive context or exploring theory and examples of interactive narrative. The second half of each session takes the form of workshop exercises and short projects through which alternative narrative forms specifically suited for an interactive environment are conceived, prototyped and evaluated. Students also work on longer-term experiments in interactive narrative, developing rule sets through which narratives may emerge, or prototyping non-narrative work.

MEDST 790: Thesis Lab 
Professor Mara Einstein
Tuesdays 4pm to 6pm, Room G200

Required for students completing their thesis projects. 

MEDST 791: Thesis Research 
Professor Mara Einstein​
Tuesdays 4 - 6 pm

For students to narrow focus, develop a research question, explore research methodologies, write a thesis proposal and conduct literature survey (or the equivalent) for the thesis project. 

 

Fall 2016 Courses

MEDST 701: Media Archeology (required for students who entered in 2015 or before)
Amy Herzog, Wednesday 3 - 5 pm
Noah Tsika, Monday 6:30 - 8:20 pm

Media archaeology is an emergent field, one that excavates the histories of contemporary media via neglected and often-obsolete practices. It is an approach that is at once deeply rooted in the materiality of media technologies, and attuned to the social and political sites in which they circulate. This project-based seminar will survey the key texts that have driven this archaeological turn in media studies, with a critical perspective on new ways the past can shed light on our current conditions. Sites of consumption and exhibition will prove central to our practice, which will involve mapping the shifting relations among technologies, users, and urban space.

MEDST 745: Advertising and Marketing: Critical Perspectives
Mara Einstein, Tues 6:30 - 8:20 pm

Critical analysis of the advertising and marketing industries, particularly as they migrated from the print and broadcast spaces to the Internet and social media. Taught by Mara Einstein, author of Black Ops Advertising, Brands of Faith, and Compassion Inc. 

MEDST 760: Rhetorical Theory: Social Movements
Michael Lacy, Wed 6:30 - 8:20 pm

A course in the rhetoric of social movements, from Saul Alinsky to Black Lives Matter. This course will cover the theory and praxis of rhetoric by social movements, as well as how to apply these techniques in the field. 

MEDST 790: Thesis Lab
Douglas Rushkoff, Wed 3 - 5 pm

For students completing their thesis projects.

MEDST 791: Thesis Research
Douglas Rushkoff, Wed 3 - 5 pm

For students to narrow focus, develop a research question, and conduct literature survey (or the equivalent) for the thesis project.  

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Creative Sound Production
Zoe Beloff, Thu 9:10 am - 1 pm

A study of sound as a creative medium in theory and practice. The class involves a study of motion picture soundtracks, sound art works, radio broadcasts, historical recordings, as well as hands on sound recording and editing using new computer technologies. 

 

Summer 2016

(June 6 - June 29)

MEDST 769: Digital Hacktivism Lab
Roy Vanegas, Sat 8:30am-12:30pm

A seminar and hands-on workshop in web, app, and physical computing specifically applied toward activist, hacktivist, and cause-related efforts. The course looks at theory and case studies of digital activism, while also teaching skills in project-based units.

MEDST 759: Studies in Communication: Networked Activism
Molly Sauter, M, T, W Th - 6p-7:40p

An intensive seminar on the history and theory of networked activism. Molly Sauter is a Vanier Scholar and a PhD candidate at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. Her research is on the political and technological philosophy of interrupted ICT spaces. She holds a Master in Comparative Media Studies from MIT, and is an affiliate scholar at the Center for Civic Media at the MIT Media Lab and at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard. She is the author of The Coming Swarm: DDoS Actions, Hacktivism, and Civil Disobedience on the Internet. 

 

Spring 2016

MEDST 752: Media Theory (3 cr.; 2 plus conf. hour)
Professor Douglas Rushkoff
Wednesday, 6:30-8:20 pm
G-200 

Media theories attempt to explain the relationship between media and society. In this course, we will encounter a variety of theoretical perspectives on old and new media, focusing particularly on the transitions between one media era and another. We will consider the impact of the alphabet on oral culture, that of the printing press on manuscript culture, electronic media on literary culture, and - perhaps most importantly - interactive media on society today. 

Instead of studying the content of a particular medium, in this course we will consider media and their underlying technologies directly, as they are understood by a variety of theorists, practitioners, critics, philosophers, activists, and artists. We will be particularly concerned with questions of human agency and autonomy, and changes in perception, social interaction, and power relationships as different media come to dominate a culture. It is our purpose to gain competence in reading and evaluating media theories, to become familiar with a theoretical approach to media, to be able to distinguish between an opinion and a theory, and to be capable of formulating and articulating our own theories about media, tools, and platforms. 

MEDST 758: Form & Genre (VT): Gender, Sexuality, and Media (3 cr.; 2 plus conf. hour)
Professor Amy Herzog
Monday, 4:00-6:00
G-200 

This course will approach questions of gender, sexuality, and power in popular media, from early cinema's appeals to middle-class female audiences at the turn of the last century, to the contemporary use of social media by feminist activists of color. Gender, sexuality, and identity will be viewed at the intersections of other biological and social categories, including race, class, orientation, ability, and ethnicity. We will examine the ways in which different media forms can be used to complicate, reinforce, exploit, or challenge those hierarchies.
 Readings will survey the history of feminist and queer media theory, as well as critiques and debates about these paradigms. We will perform formal analyses of media texts, in addition to other methodological approaches (ethnographic, legal, sociological, media archeological, and philosophical) that situate gender and sexuality within evolving cultural contexts.

MEDST 758: Form & Genre (VT): Drawing II/Experimental Media (3 cr.; 4 hours)
Professor Zoe Beloff
Friday, 10:15-1:50
KP 138 

This class will focus on personal and collective storytelling . Returning to the roots of moving image technology, we will experiment with new forms of expression and narrative while creating do-it-yourself media apparatuses, direct film animation, video for performance, and graphic novels. There will be hands on projects, screenings and discussions. It is open to all students, undergraduate and graduate, art or media, who wish to expand their creative potential. No prior technical knowhow or drawing skills are necessary. It is recommended for graduate students who wish to explore hands on media archeology practices using analog equipment.  

MEDST 758: Form & Genre (VT): SOUND (3 cr.; 4 hour)
Professor Zoe Beloff
Thursday, 2:40-6:30
MU-225H

A study of sound as a creative medium in theory and practice. The class involves a study of motion picture soundtracks, sound art works, radio broadcasts, historical recordings, as well as hands on sound recording and editing using new computer technologies.

MEDST 759: Studies in Communication (VT): Media Activism: Black Rebellion & Revolutionary Media
(3 cr.; 2 plus conf. hour)
Professor Roopali Mukherjee
Tuesday 6:30-8:30
G 200

This course offers an intellectual survey of dissent with a particular focus on activist media forms that have shaped, and been shaped by, enduring struggles for black autonomy, voice, freedom, and power. Introducing theoretical approaches to the "revolutionary imagination" drawn from formative works by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, Antonio Gramsci, Walter Benjamin, W.E.B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Cedric Robinson, and others, the course explores a range of activist media forms – early abolitionist journalism, black film, hip-hop, viral media campaigns including, most recently, Black Lives Matter – with an eye to understanding how media activism intersects with, and has been influenced by, histories of black rebellion in the United States.

MEDST 764: International Media Systems: Transnational Media (3 cr.; 2 plus conf. hour)
Professor Anu Kapse
Monday 6:30-8:30
G 200

If screen media (including cinema, television, and social media) are transnational phenomena, how and why might they be used for specific local or national purposes? The goal of the course will be to explore and identify forms of media practice that resist cultural imperialism, and work alongside or against global, transnational norms be they perpetuated by state or corporate entities. Class discussions will pay particular attention to Asia, the Middle East and the global South using  examples from this part of the world as case studies to frame understandings of comparative international media practices.

MEDST 790/MEDST 791: Thesis/Thesis Research
Professor Richard Maxwell
Tuesday 4:00-6:00
G 200

 

Fall 2015

MEDST 757: Media and Politics
Mark Hannah
Wednesday, 6:30-8:20 pm
G-200

The theory, use and abuse of media and technology in political and issues campaigns, including polling, big data, crisis management, social media, debate preparation, media appearances, framing of issues and language, taught by the media scholar who worked on media and debate prep for Obama 08 and Kerry 04. 

MEDST 703: Media and Social Change
Arun Kundnani
Tuesday, 6:30-8:20 pm
G-200

Seminar examines political, economic and sociological approaches to media as agents of historical change and social transformation, topics include the digitization of society and how information technology and networks work within digital capitalism, and the significance of contemporary media within abiding struggles over injustice, exploitation, and social change.

MEDST 760: Rhetorical Theory 
Technologies of Persuasion
Douglas Rushkoff
Wednesday, 2:40 - 4:30 pm
G-200

The (dark) arts of influence as practiced through media and interactive technology. Propaganda to mind control, captology, and user engagement. Deconstruction and critique of the history of influence, as well as crafting projects to influence others.

MEDST 758: Form & Genre: Digital Hacktivism Lab
Roy Vanegas
Monday, 7:00 - 8:50 pm
G Building Basement Lab

A seminar and hands-on workshop in web, app, and physical computing specifically applied toward activist, hacktivist, and cause-related efforts. The course looks at theory and case studies of digital activism, while also teaching skills in project-based units.

 

Spring 2015

MEDST 701: Media Archaeology
Instructor: Noah Tsika

Time: Mondays, 6:30 – 8:20, plus conference hour TBA
Location: Kiely Hall, room 315
Course Code for Registration: 58521

This introduction to media historiography surveys material approaches to media history, locating media artifacts within broader cultural contexts, and mapping established and emergent audiovisual archives.

The spring 2015 version of the course will consider media archaeology as a disciplinary and methodological response to a variety of political, cultural, social, and economic constraints—a way of finding and building audiovisual archives that resist conventional historiographic methods. We will begin by addressing the ongoing tensions between the ordering practices imposed on the global South by European colonialism and the chaotic archives characteristic of the postcolony. We will also address the question of missing archives and "impossible" archaeologies. Using the career of Orson Welles as a case study, we will examine the scholarly practice of writing media history based on missing or incomplete projects, lawsuits, rumors, and material fragments. Finally, we will study—and ourselves produce—archaeologies of the internet, considering the question of how to excavate, or locate traces of, videos from the pre-YouTube era; videos that have been removed from various sites; and videos whose provenance has been the understudied, previously unacknowledged, or legally fraught "pockets" of the internet that may prove to be among the most reliable sources of audiovisual evidence.

MEDST 758: Form and Genre: Interactive Narrative Lab
Instructor: Douglas Rushkoff

Time: Wednesdays, 6:30 – 8:20, plus conference hour TBA
Location: G-Building, 200
Course Code for Registration: 77631

This graduate-level laboratory class considers the impact of interactivity on traditional narrative structure, and explores new methods for conveying narrative in non-linear, digital, and augmented forms of art, entertainment, and communications. How can we create the experiences of reversal, recognition, and catharsis in interactive contexts - and do we want to?

Each class meeting is broken up into two parts. The first is a seminar discussion either examining an aspect of traditional narrative and the way it is threatened or rendered obsolete in an interactive context or exploring theory and examples of interactive narrative. The second half of each session takes the form of workshop exercises and short projects through which alternative narrative forms specifically suited for an interactive environment are conceived, prototyped and evaluated. Students also work on longer-term experiments in interactive narrative, developing rule sets through which narratives may emerge, or prototyping non-narrative work.

This course is suitable for traditional practitioners looking to incorporate interactive narrative elements into their work, as well as experimental and digital artists and theorists exploring new narrative forms. Readings will include Aristotle, Egri, Ball, McKee, Ibsen, Shaw, Brecht, McLoud, Mackendrick, Kaprow, Huizinga, Ryan, Zimmerman, Kucklich, Crawford, Meadows and Rushkoff.

Open to non-department and undergraduates with instructor permission.

MEDST 759: Studies in Communication: Digital Economics
Instructor: Matthew Crain

Time: Tuesdays, 6:30p-8:20p, plus conference hour TBA
Location: Kiely 315
Course Code for Registration 58391

In the last three decades, developments in networked digital communications have challenged established modes of media production, consumption, and circulation. New opportunities for media communication abound, but "disruption" has not produced a digital landscape free of constraints. From the sleek and pragmatic monetization of search advertising to the ham-fisted prosecution of intellectual property "pirates," industry has unevenly adapted existing business models to meet new circumstances. How do we make sense of a media system where everything has changed, but so much remains the same?

This course provides a critical survey of these transformations, analyzing the structure and social significance of digital economies in relation to still powerful 20th century mass media models. A key starting point is the premise that the technological aspects of media convergence are deeply intertwined within broader dynamics of "post-industrial" capitalism. Course topics may include: the development of the commercial internet and digital media convergence; market structures of online publishing and advertising; consumer surveillance and big data; the crisis of journalism; intellectual property; post-network television; and public policy. Concepts from economics, legal studies, political economy, and media studies are utilized. Emphasis is placed on how digital economies impact collaboration, autonomy, and political and cultural participation on the internet.

All Course Descriptions ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


 
 

 Office Information

 
Mara Einstein
Director
Media Studies Masters Program
mara.einstein@qc.cuny.edu


Laboratory for Digital Humanism Podcast


 

 Colloquia Schedule

 

Fall 2017

September 13: Courtney Ritter
Civic Technology

September 27: Joost Raessens
Ecogames, or how to make players become ecological citizens

October 4: Andy Fisher
Big Hunger


October 11: Mitch Horowitz
Occult America & Media

October 18: Sean Ansett
Fairphone: Incremental to Transformative

October 25: Dr. Alexandra Juhasz
#100HardTruths - #FakeNews


November 1: Jennifer Rittner
Designing for Social Justice

November 8: L.A. Kauffman
Direct Action


November 15: Prof. Julian Cornell
Active Shooter: Mass Murder, Media Narratives, and Gun Violence


November 22: Jason Van Anden
Social Justice Apps


November 29: Thesis Colloquia

Colloquia Schedule
 

 Related Links

 
Stay Social at QC YouTube Facebook Twitter Gray Bar Calendar MyQC QC Mobile CUNY first Blackboard QC Bookstore

Click each division to view a complete list of its departments


Adult Collegiate Education | English Language Institute | Professional & Continuing Studies
Summer Session | Weekend College | Winter Session



Resources for Combating Sexual Harassment/Sexual Assault (Title IX)

Queens College is CUNY
DirectionsMap  |  Emergency Preparedness  |  Working at QC  |  Student Consumer Info  |  A-Z Index  | 
Queens College, CUNY | 65-30 Kissena Blvd. | Queens, NY 11367-1597 | Phone: (718) 997-5000 Copyright © 2004-