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Home > Academics > Divisions > Education > Secondary Education and Youth Services
Secondary Education and Youth Services

Mathematics Adolescent Education

The three programs support a learner-centered philosophy of the teaching and learning of mathematics to preadolescents and adolescents. They build on a framework that highlights the importance of developing pre-service and in-service teachers’ knowledge about mathematics, about learning and learners, about teaching, and about the teachers’ knowledge about themselves as learners and as teachers. The program is designed to develop a strong mathematical content knowledge base. A focus is also placed on beliefs about teaching and learning, supporting the belief that all students can learn mathematics and can learn to appreciate its beauty and utility. The goals that teachers set for themselves are charted and analyzed during the course of each of the programs. 

Undergraduate Bachelor of Arts: Leading to New York State Initial Certification

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The undergraduate program is structured sequentially and is developmentally rooted on a strong, rigorous and relevant mathematics foundation. Students major in mathematics and minor in secondary education (24 credits). Consistent with the other programs in Secondary Education, undergraduates in secondary mathematics education typically begin their education courses in their upper sophomore or lower junior year. A faculty member in the Mathematics Department provides advisement for the students’ course of study in mathematics. Likewise, a faculty member in the Department of Secondary Education provides advisement for education course work. 

The objectives of our program are to facilitate the teaching competence of prospective secondary school mathematics teachers by providing educational experiences that will:

1. Increase their knowledge and understanding of the content of 
    mathematics and school mathematics.

2. Increase their knowledge and understanding of the learner and the   
    learning process.

3. Enable them to develop a repertoire of student-centered teaching strategies and skills 
    that they can use in their teaching careers.

4. Broaden their understanding of the variety of ways that technology can be used to 
    learn and teach mathematics.

5. Broaden their understanding of the diversity of learners, learning styles, 
    and behaviors and ways to make mathematics accessible to all.

6. Increase their knowledge of multiple means of assessment and how to incorporate 
    their use in the mathematics classroom.

All of the courses in the secondary education minor require some type of either fieldwork or student-teaching experience. The beginning courses in the education sequence (SEYS 201, 221, and 340) each require students to spend 25 hours in a school. SEYS 221 specifies that this experience take place in a middle school. Typically, students observe classes and tutor individual students in mathematics (please note that students in the TIME 2000 program have a special lesson-study type fieldwork experience in a professional development site when they take SEYS 221 as lower freshmen). When students reach their senior year their involvement in the middle and high school intensifies. In the fall semester students take the cognition, instruction and technology-based psychology class, SEYS 350, in conjunction with the methods class, SEYS 361. As part of the 100 hours of fieldwork requirement in SEYS 371.2: Initial Clinical Experience, students do microteaching in a middle school or a high school. They are supervised by specialized classroom teachers as well as by college supervisors who visit them periodically as they work with small and large groups of middle school or high school students. As part of their requirements for the methods course, students observe for 25 hours in a high school or a middle school. If their Initial Clinical Experience is in a middle school, they will observe in a high school and ultimately, student teach in a high school. If their Initial Clinical Experience is in a high school, they will observe in a middle school, and ultimately, student teach in a middle school. The purpose of the observations is to gain familiarity with the school, the students, and the faculty in preparation for their student-teaching experience in the spring semester. In the spring semester, students spend a minimum of six periods per day student teaching in a high school or middle school depending on the previous semester’s Initial Clinical Experience placement. They are observed by college supervisors a minimum of four times during the course of the semester. As part of each observation experience, students prepare detailed pre-lesson thoughts, lesson plans, and post-conference reflections.

TIME 2000: A subset of the Undergraduate Secondary Mathematics Education Program is the TIME 2000 Program, a four-year funded program in which students are recruited from high school and unlike traditional programs, students begin teacher preparation in their lower freshman semester. They are block scheduled into their courses in mathematics and education. In addition to the coursework, students meet with each other and the project staff on a monthly basis for seminars, for special projects and events, for advisement, and to obtain feedback regarding the program. They are also required to attend at least one mathematics education conference per year. The TIME 2000 Program reflects our philosophy that preparing teachers to employ reformed-based approaches requires a shift in traditional beliefs about teaching and learning. We believe that such shifts from traditional beliefs are only possible when working intensely with future teachers over an extended period of time of four years that provide opportunities to (a) become acclimated to the profession (attendance at professional conferences; participation in monthly seminars; informal mathematics-related trips and experiences); (b) study mathematics in a structured and coherent sequence, coordinated with secondary education requirements; (c) participate in innovative, lesson-study type field work.

(2) Post Baccalaureate New York State Initial Certificate Program

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Since students enter this program with a strong background in mathematics, their course of study highlights the teaching and learning of mathematics. As such, with the exception of the first objective, the objectives listed for the undergraduate program are also the objectives for the post-bacs.

The objectives of our program are to facilitate the teaching competence of prospective secondary school mathematics teachers by providing educational experiences that will:

1. Increase their knowledge and understanding of the content of school mathematics.

2. Increase their knowledge and understanding of the learner and the learning process.

3. Enable them to develop a repertoire of student-centered teaching strategies and skills 
    that they can use in their teaching careers.

4. Broaden their understanding of the variety of ways that technology can be used to 
    learn and teach mathematics.

5. Broaden their understanding of the diversity of learners, learning styles, and 
    behaviors and ways to make mathematics accessible to all.

6. Increase their knowledge of multiple means of assessment and how to incorporate 
    their use in the mathematics classroom.

All of the courses in the secondary education minor require some type of either fieldwork or student-teaching experience. The courses in the foundations of education and language literacy and culture (SEYS 536 and 700, respectively) each require students to spend a minimum of 30 hours in a school. Students spend an academic year in which their involvement in the middle and high school is intense. In the fall semester students take the psychology class, SEYS 552, in conjunction with the methods class, SEYS 561. As part of the 100 hours of fieldwork requirement in SEYS 371.2: students do microteaching in a middle school or a high school. They are supervised by specialized classroom teachers as well as by college supervisors who visit them periodically as they work with small and large groups of middle school or high school students. As part of their requirements for the methods course, students observe for 30 hours in a high school or a middle school.

If their Initial Clinical Experience is in a middle school, they will observe in a high school and ultimately, student teach in a high school. If their Initial Clinical Experience is in a high school, they will observe in a middle school, and ultimately, student teach in a middle school. The purpose of the observations is to gain familiarity with the school, the students, and the faculty in preparation for their student-teaching experience in the spring semester. In the spring semester, students spend a minimum of six periods per day student teaching in a high school or middle school depending on the previous semester’s Initial Clinical Experience placement. They are observed by college supervisors a minimum of four times during the course of the semester. As part of each observation experience, students prepare detailed pre-lesson thoughts, lesson plans, and post-conference reflections.

(3) Master of Science in Education: Leading to New York State Professional Certification

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Since graduates enter this program with a strong background in mathematics and education, their course of study continues to strengthen their mathematics and pedagogical content knowledge.

The objectives of our program are to advance the teaching competence of in-service secondary school mathematics teachers by providing educational experiences that will:

1. Increase their knowledge and understanding of the content of   mathematics and 
    school mathematics.

2. Increase their knowledge and understanding of the learner and the learning process.

3. Enable them to develop a repertoire of student-centered teaching strategies and skills 
    that they can use in their teaching careers.

4. Broaden their understanding of the variety of ways that technology can be used to 
    learn and teach mathematics.

5. Broaden their understanding of the diversity of learners, learning styles, and 
    behaviors and ways to make mathematics accessible to all.

6. Increase their knowledge of multiple means of assessment and how to incorporate 
    their use in the mathematics classroom.

7. Increase candidates’ knowledge of and ability to do research in mathematics 
    education and become teacher researchers.

Since participants in this program are already teaching, there are no field experiences that are required. However, as part of their coursework, participants are required to try out some of the approaches that are discussed in their courses. As part of their academic year of research, it is recommended that students use their teaching as a context for their research.

 

 
 

 Office Information

 

 

 Program Advisors

 

Alice Artzt
Powdermaker Hall 150-E
Telephone: (718) 997-5169
Email: Alice.Artzt@qc.cuny.edu

Frances Curcio
Powdermaker Hall 150-G
Telephone: (718) 997-5154
Email: Frances.Curcio@qc.cuny.edu

     



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