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Required Courses with Descriptions

Freshman

Lower Freshman

Accounting

ACCT 101. Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Accounting I. 4 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Minimum of 12 credits completed. Fundamentals of accounting information, the foundation of the accounting system for recording assets, liability and equity transactions, financial statement principles, and the preparation and interpretation of basic financial statements. Structure, double-entry model, initial, adjusting, and closing entries are covered. The theoretical and quantitative aspects of depreciation, inventory valuation, and stockholders’ equity transactions are introduced and explored. Fall, Spring

Economics, Business, & Computer Science

ECON 101. Introduction to Macroeconomics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: High school algebra and trigonometry. Covers the nature and methods of economics and survey of major economics problems; the determinants of national income and output, the price level, and employment; the role of money and banking in the economy; and the role of the government’s fiscal and monetary policies. May not be taken for credit if ECON 103 has already been taken. (SS, US)

Upper Freshman

Accounting

ACCT 102. Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Accounting II. 4 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 101 and freshman standing. A continuation of ACCT 101, with a much more in-depth study of the groundwork and constructed preparation needed in various balance sheet and income statement areas prior to the preparation of financial statements, including managerial accounting with basic quantitative analysis. Fall, Spring

Economics, Business, & Computer Science

ECON 102. Introduction to Microeconomics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: High school algebra and trigonometry. How decisions are made by the consumer and producer sectors of the economy and the interactions between the two sectors; the process of resource allocation and income distribution within a free enterprise economy as well as alternative market structures such as monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition; and the effects of various government policies on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income. May not be taken for credit if ECON 104 has already been taken. (SS, US)

CSCI 48. Spreadsheet Programming. 2 hr. lec., 2 lab. hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: One Math course numbered 110 or higher. In-depth introduction to spreadsheets as a tool for organizing, processing, and analyzing numerical information in such areas as business, finance, engineering, natural and social sciences. Topics include basic cell operations, text manipulation, formulas, functions, arrays, circular references, charting techniques, pivot tables, conditional formatting, and VBA programming.

Sophomore

Lower Sophomore

Accounting

ACCT 201 Intermediate Accounting I. 4 hr.; 4 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 102 and sophomore standing. Intensive study of the theories of financial accounting, generally accepted accounting principles, and applications thereof, including relevant standards, statements, and opinions of the FASB, AICPA, and SEC. Pertinent mathematical principles and applications relating to financial accounting are also presented. Fall, Spring

ACCT 305. Cost Accounting. 3 hr.; 2 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 102 and sophomore standing. The concepts and procedures used to account for the cost of manufacturing and selling, with their practical application in different types of cost accumulation systems (i.e., job-order costing, process costing, joint-product costing, standard costing, and direct costing). Fall, Spring

Law and Taxation

ACCT 261. Business Law I. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Sophomore standing. Introduction to the law. Seeks to provide majors and nonmajors with an understanding of the law and the social forces that shape it. The basic structure through which law is implemented and enforced is reviewed, in addition to the specific rules of law relating to contracts, trusts, and estates. Fall, Spring (IS)

Economics, Business, & Computer Science

BUS 241. Corporation Finance. 3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 102. An analysis of the major funds flows of the firm. Development of the principles for determining specific assets a firm should acquire, as well as the least-cost methods of financing those assets. Topics considered include the management of cash, inventories, receivables, and fixed assets; alternative sources of available funds, including short-, intermediate-, and longterm sources of financing; the cost of capital; optimum capital structure; and corporate dividend policy. Fall, Spring

Upper Sophomore

Accounting

ACCT 202. Intermediate Accounting II. ACCT 202: 3 hr.; 2 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 201, and sophomore standing. Intensive study of the theories of financial accounting, generally accepted accounting principles, and applications thereof, including relevant standards, statements, and opinions of the FASB, AICPA, and SEC. Pertinent mathematical principles and applications relating to financial accounting are also presented. Fall, Spring

Law and Taxation

ACCT 362, 362W. Business Law II. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 261, ENGL 110, and sophomore standing. The law relating to forms of business organizations. Focus centers on agency and partnership relationships, corporate structure, and the role of government in business. Also considered are landlord relationships and bailments. Fall, Spring

Economics, Business, & Computer Science

ECON 249. Statistics as Applied to Economics and Business. 3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and MATH 122 or 131, 141, 151, or 157. The topics covered are descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, sampling statistical inference, estimation, and simple correlation and regression. (Not open to students with credit for MATH 241, which will be accepted in lieu of ECON 249.) Fall, Spring

Junior

Lower Junior

Accounting

ACCT 311. Advanced Accounting. 4 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 202 and junior standing. Theory of accounting applicable to problems peculiar to large-scale business operations, including business combinations, consolidations, partnerships, foreign exchange translation, segment and interim reporting. Open to declared Accounting & Information Systems majors only. Fall, Spring

ACCT 306. Quantitative Techniques in Planning and Control. 4 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 305, ECON 249, and junior standing. The application of quantitative and programming techniques in managerial decision-making, including probability analysis, mathematical programming, network models, queuing theory, Monte Carlo simulation, and regression/correlation analysis, inventory models, and capital budgeting. Fall, Spring

Economics, Business, & Computer Science

ECON 215. Money and Banking. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104. Description and analysis of monetary and banking principles and institutions

CSCI 48. Spreadsheet Programming. 2 hr. lec., 2 lab. hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: One Math course numbered 110 or higher. In-depth introduction to spreadsheets as a tool for organizing, processing, and analyzing numerical information in such areas as business, finance, engineering, natural and social sciences. Topics include basic cell operations, text manipulation, formulas, functions, arrays, circular references, charting techniques, pivot tables, conditional formatting, and VBA programming. (MQR)

Upper Junior

Accounting

ACCT 321 Auditing I. 4 hr.; 3 cr.Prereq: ACCT 202 and junior standing. Principles and standards relevant to the attestation function in the practice of professional accountancy including audits, examinations, reviews, and agreed-upon procedures. Coverage also includes professional ethics, liability, risk and assurance, evidence, introduction to internal control and reporting. This course provides exposure to the techniques of modern auditing, including the flowcharting, analysis, and understanding of accounting cycles and their related control systems, analytical review of financial statements, analytical tests of accounting estimates, and statistical sampling for tests of transactions and accounts. Fall, Spring

ACCT 372. Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting and Auditing. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 202 and junior standing. The course focuses on accounting, financial reporting, and auditing relevant to governmental and not-for-profit entities. Fall, Spring

Senior

Lower Senior

Accounting

ACCT 322. Auditing II. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 321, ECON 249, and senior standing. Principles and standards relevant to the attestation function in the practice of professional accountancy including audits, examinations, reviews, and agreed-upon procedures. Coverage also includes professional ethics, liability, risk and assurance, evidence, introduction to internal control and reporting. This course provides exposure to the techniques of modern auditing, including the flowcharting, analysis, and understanding of accounting cycles and their related control systems, analytical review of financial statements, analytical tests of accounting estimates, and statistical sampling for tests of transactions and accounts. Fall, Spring

Law and Taxation

ACCT 367. Federal and New York State Taxes on Income. 4 hr.; 4 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 102 and senior standing. An introduction to the federal income tax as it relates to individuals. Particular emphasis is given to the basic multitiered tax structure. The underlying concepts of basis, inclusion, exclusion, and deduction are defined, utilizing the Internal Revenue Code and related material. Special classes of taxpayers including partnerships, estates, trusts, corporations of various types, and foreign taxpayers are considered as well as accounting and procedural rules.

Elective Course Options - Elective Course Descriptions

Accounting

ACCT 341. Accounting Information Systems. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: CSCI 48, and ACCT 201 and 305 and junior standing or above. This course focuses on methods and techniques for the analysis and evaluation of the design of accounting information systems, including computer-based systems. Topics covered will include an introduction to accounting systems theory, analysis of accounting systems, including documentation and design theory, accounting file structure, hardware/software selection and impact on accounting systems, system life cycle, including accounting controls, and systems implementation and maintenance from the auditor’s standpoint. This course will require some use of computer resources. Fall, Spring

ACCT 343. Microcomputer Applications in Accounting. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: CSCI 48 and ACCT 202 and 305 and junior standing or above. This course deals with specific uses of microcomputers as tools in the discipline of accounting in the following areas: transaction processing, analysis, and report preparation using commercial accounting systems; and mathematical and statistical analysis models that are used for managerial and financial accounting purposes. Software used includes database management systems with translation utilities, permitting transfer of data from one commercial system to another through the use of Data Interchange Formats. Integrated packages are used to prepare reports incorporating analyzed data and graphics.

ACCT 350. Financial Statement Analysis. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 311. Analysis is made of financial statements from the perspective of users and preparers of financial reports, including investors, creditors, auditors, accountants, and management. Financial statements and related disclosures will be analyzed to gain a perspective on the company’s health.

ACCT 363. Business Law III. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 362 and senior standing. The law relating to commercial transactions. Focus of the course is the Uniform Commercial Code, with particular emphasis on sales law, commercial paper law, and the law of secured transactions. Also considered are the laws relating to intellectual property, professional liability, international law, insurance, and bankruptcy. Fall, Spring

ACCT 385. Data Analytics for Accountants. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Coreq.: ACCT 202. The course utilizes various data-analytic tools (Excel, IDEA, “R,” Python, Tableau, XBRL) used by accountants and CPAs in auditing, taxation, and consulting services. The emphasis is on hands-on learning by completing projects in the classroom and for homework to develop the data-analytic skills valued by employers. An elective course for the major in Accounting and Information Systems will satisfy either the “A (Accounting)” or “B (Business or Economics)” elective category. Fall, Spring

ACCT 393W. Seminar in Accounting. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ENGL 110. Successful completion of ACCT 391, 392, and permission of the department.

ACCT 398. Internship. 140 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: Permission of the chair. Open only to Accounting majors who are at least lower juniors with a major GPA of at least 3.0. Under the supervision of a full-time faculty member in Accounting, students will complete at least 140 hours of work at an approved accounting firm. Students will keep a daily log of activities, read two books approved by the faculty mentor, preparing book summaries of 5–8 pages each, and will meet bi-weekly with the faculty mentor to assess progress. Students will write a final research paper of at least 20 pages on a topic relevant to the nature and scope of the internship, and which has been approved by the faculty mentor. The internship may be used as one of the “Group A” electives required for the major in Accounting and Information Systems. For more information on ACCT 398, CLICK.

ACCT 331. Advanced Accounting Problems. 4 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 306 and 311. Emphasis on the application of accounting theory and problem-solving techniques in analyzing and solving complex problems in accounting. Fall, Spring

ACCT 355. Accounting in International Environments. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 306, 311, and senior standing. This advanced-level course takes up the accounting, tax, and control problems and procedures arising from the flow of goods, services, money, and investments across national frontiers. Not open to students who have received credit for BUS 255.

ACCT 369. Gift and Estate Taxation. 2 hr.; 2 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 367 or 368. The laws and regulations of the federal and New York State governments governing taxes on gifts and at death. Considers both theory and practice; includes discussion of procedure.

ACCT 373. Communication and Ethics for Accountants. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 311 and senior standing. Understanding of the role of communications and ethics in the accounting workplace setting by developing students’ verbal, nonverbal, and written communication skills. Students will be introduced to techniques of appropriate communication in the workplace, along with an appreciation for cultural diversity in all settings. The goal of the course is for students to clearly be able to explain concepts, results, and regulations to clients as well as make effective and appropriate inquiries in performing professional accounting services. In addition, case studies will be used to examine ethical issues and further emphasize the role of the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct.

ACCT 382. Seminar in Advanced Managerial Accounting Theory. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ACCT 202 and 306 (senior standing recommended).

ACCT 391 Special Problems. ACCT 391.1–391.3, 1–3 hr.; 1–3 cr., Open to students of advanced standing who receive permission of the department to register. Recommended for students of high academic standing who want to undertake some special research topic related to accounting.

ACCT 392. Special Problems. ACCT 392.1–392.3, 1–3 hr.; 1–3 cr. Open to students of advanced standing who receive permission of the department to register. Recommended for students of high academic standing who want to undertake some special research topic related to accounting.

Business

BUS 243 – Economics of Distribution and Marketing. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 102 and BUS 160W. Functions, structure, and cost of the system of distribution of goods and services. Emphasizes the dynamic character of marketing and the major problems encountered at every stage of the distribution process. Merchandising and sales promotional activities, price policies, selection of channels of distribution.

BUS 247 – Business Economics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 102. The application of economic principles to the problems of business decision-making. Topics considered include decisions under risk and uncertainty; economic forecasting; estimation of demand and cost functions; price strategy under monopoly, oligopoly, and competition; diversification and conglomeration; and productivity analysis in worker and executive compensation.

BUS 341w – BUS 341W. Intermediate Finance. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: BUS 160W, BUS 241, and ECON 249, or permission of the instructor. Open to BBA majors or by permission of the department. Covers the five most important problems of modern finance at a level beyond BUS 241. These are: the relationship between risk and returns, as expressed in the Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory; the valuation of debt and equity instruments; the cost of capital and optimal capital structure; capital budgeting; and dividend policy

BUS 351 – Financial Markets. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: BUS 241 or permission of the instructor and MATH 131 or equivalent.Open to BBA majors or by permission of the department. Survey of the United States and international money and capital markets. Emphasis is on modern institutions and practices. The course also considers the analytics and consequences of recent trading techniques.

Economics

ECON 201. Macroeconomic Analysis. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104. National income measurement; macroeconomic theories of income, employment, prices, and interest rates; public policies for growth and stabilization. This course cannot be taken for credit if ECON 226 has been taken (see also ECON 226). Fall, Spring

ECON 202. Price Theory. 3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and MATH 131 or the equivalent. Familiarizes the student with the technical tools of economic analysis. Covers price, input and output decisions of the business firm; the forces behind supply of and demand for the product of the firm and industry; and the factors determining the distribution of income. This course cannot be taken for credit if ECON 225 has been taken (see also ECON 225). Fall, Spring

ECON 213 – Economics of the Labor Force. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and ENGL 110. Theoretical and public policy issues relating to wage determination, labor markets, the labor force, wages, prices, productivity, employment, human resources, and income maintenance

ECON 214 – Economics of organized Labor. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and ENGL 110. Includes collective bargaining in the public and private sectors and labor problems of minorities.

ECON 218 – The economics of state and Local Finance. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and ENGL 110. Such topics as the demand for government services, intergovernmental fiscal relations, the distribution of various public services within and between governmental jurisdictions, governmental budgeting processes, and sources of revenue.

ECON 220 – Consumer economics and personal Finance. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and ENGL 110. This course covers personal financial planning, consumer decision-making, present value theory, money management, and credit. Specific topics include: income taxes, investing and portfolio management, risk management (insurance), pensions, long-term family and estate planning, and the problems of information and transaction costs. Includes the use of computer spreadsheets to solve various case problems.

ECON 225 – Price Theory (Mathematics emphasis). (formerly ECON 205M)3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and MATH 132 or 143 or 152. Identical to ECON 202, except taught with a greater use of mathematical tools. Recommended for students planning to do graduate work in economics and business. This course cannot be taken for credit if ECON 202 has been taken.

ECON 226 – Macroeconomic Analysis (Mathematics emphasis). (formerly ECON 206M) 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and MATH 132 or 143 or 152. Identical to ECON 201 except taught with a greater use of mathematical tools. Recommended for students planning to do graduate work in economics and business. This course cannot be taken for credit if ECON 201 has been taken.

ECON 229 – History of International Business and Finance, 1850 to the present. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104. This course will study the evolution of typical international business and financial structures and their performance through readings and lectures on international enterprise and national economic histories from the first era of globalization to the present. The business of export-import, financing trade and international investment, and multinational enterprise will be covered. Other topics will include the evolution of international monetary systems, trade regulation, and the size of the international economy.

ECON 242 – Regulation of American Business. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and ENGL 110. The origin, evaluation, and present pattern of government regulation of business; the organization of industry; antitrust and the promotion of competition and prevention of monopoly and public regulation; public policies in natural resource and environmental conservation.

ECON 246 – Urban Economics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104, and ENGL 110. The microeconomics of U.S. urban development patterns from the industrial revolution to the present. Decentralization of economic activity and population; the resulting urban problems and possible solutions to these problems.

ECON 326 – International Economics. 3 hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: ECON 202 or 225. An introduction to the theory of international trade and to empirical tests of trade theory.

ECON 382 – Introduction to Econometrics. 3 lec., 1 lab. hr.; 3 cr. Prereq.: MATH 131 or equivalent and ECON 249 or equivalent. This course will begin with a review of statistics and hypothesis testing, then introduce simple and multiple regression techniques; the estimation of regression using ordinary least squares; inference; and the use of spreadsheets and statistical software to estimate economic models.